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In the following code, I was under the impression that using a 'fat arrow' would allow me access to the class variables. Instead, regardless of fat or skinny arrow, I am not able to access the '@accounts' variable.

Any suggestions?

class MyClass
  accounts:[]
  constructor: (@accounts) -> 
    ($ '.the_buttons').live 'click', bind_clicks

  bind_clicks = (event) -> 
    console.log @accounts

jQuery -> 
  m = new MyClass([1, 2, 3])

Thanks.

Update

Looks like I had mistyped previously causing a bit of my problem.

Here is code that sort-of does the trick

class MyClass
  accounts:[]
  constructor: (@accounts) -> 
    ($ '.the_buttons').live 'click', (event) => bind_clicks(event)

  bind_clicks: (event) => 
    console.log @accounts

jQuery -> 
  m = new MyClass([1, 2, 3])

However, it feels odd to resort to making the bind_clicks a public method.

share|improve this question
    
be aware that accounts will be shared between all instances of MyClass, being part of it's prototype. If you don't want that you have to assign @accounts inside the constructor function. –  Ricardo Tomasi Jan 5 '12 at 0:08

4 Answers 4

You can do that

class MyClass
  bind_clicks = (event) -> 
    console.log @accounts

  accounts:null
  constructor: (@accounts) -> 
    ($ '.the_buttons').live 'click', bind_clicks


jQuery -> 
  m = new MyClass([1, 2, 3])

bind_clicks is declared BEFORE the instance methods. It is private. BUT, it is a private class method. It will generate a closure, that's why. I would suggest to use _bind_clicks, the underscore prefix is a common convention to define private methods. Since this doesn't really exist in javascript.

Be careful also when you declare accounts:[], I would suggest accounts:null, more on this: http://html5stars.com/?p=148

share|improve this answer

You can try this out: http://jsfiddle.net/zp6LJ/1/

The private method will have to be defined int he constructor function to achieve what you are looking for.

class MyClass
  accounts:[]
  constructor: (@accounts) -> 
    bind_clicks = (event) =>
      console.log @accounts

    $('.the_buttons').click bind_clicks

jQuery -> 
  m = new MyClass([1, 2, 3])
share|improve this answer

You can make bind_clicks private as follows:

class MyClass
  accounts:[]
  constructor: (@accounts, @button) ->
    bind_clicks = (event) =>
      console.log @accounts 
    @button.click bind_clicks

class Button
  click: (@f) ->
  do_click: -> @f('event') 

button = new Button()
m = new MyClass([1, 2, 3], button)
console.log m.bind_clicks # undefined (private)
button.do_click() # [1, 2, 3]
share|improve this answer

Another possible way of doing this. It's pretty similar to yours.

class MyClass
  constructor: (@accounts) -> 
    $('body').live 'click', @bind_clicks

  bind_clicks: (event) => 
    console.log @accounts

$ ->
  m = new MyClass([1, 2, 3])

Don't quote me on this, but I don't think JS has any notion of public/private methods. I supposed if you don't want to expose the method you could do this instead. But you might run the risk or repeating yourself if you use this method more than once.

class MyClass
  constructor: (@accounts) -> 
    $('body').live 'click', (event) => 
      console.log @accounts

$ ->
  m = new MyClass([1, 2, 3])

Good luck! Sandro

note: I bounded the events from the body so I could test out the code.

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