Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let's say I have the following string:

something1:    +12.0   (some unnecessary trailing data (this must go))
something2:    +15.5   (some more unnecessary trailing data)
something4:    +9.0   (some other unnecessary data)
something1:    +13.5  (blah blah blah)

How do I turn that into simply

+12.0,+15.5,+9.0,+13.5

in bash?

share|improve this question

9 Answers 9

up vote 18 down vote accepted

You can use awk and sed:

awk -vORS=, '{ print $2 }' file.txt | sed 's/,$/\n/'

Or if you want to use a pipe:

echo "data" | awk -vORS=, '{ print $2 }' | sed 's/,$/\n/'

To break it down:

  • awk is great at handling data broken down into fields
  • -vORS=, sets the "output record separator" to ,, which is what you wanted
  • { print $2 } tells awk to print the second field for every record (line)
  • file.txt is your filename
  • sed just gets rid of the trailing , and turns it into a newline (if you want no newline, you can do s/,$//)
share|improve this answer

Clean and simple:

awk '{print $2}' < file.txt | paste -s -d,
share|improve this answer
3  
Might need to add a - at the end of the paste command to have it use standard input. –  chrisf Dec 20 '13 at 1:13
    
Worked great for my needs. I forgot about the paste command. –  thebigdog Apr 22 at 20:08
$ awk -v ORS=, '{print $2}' data.txt | sed 's/,$//'
+12.0,+15.5,+9.0,+13.5

$ cat data.txt | tr -s ' ' | cut -d ' ' -f 2 | tr '\n' ',' | sed 's/,$//'
+12.0,+15.5,+9.0,+13.5
share|improve this answer
    
cheers, what about if the input to awk was through standard input (just put function | awk... in your example? –  Alex Coplan Jan 3 '12 at 15:21
    
Yes, I think so. –  kev Jan 3 '12 at 15:22

This should work too

awk '{print $2}' file | sed ':a;{N;s/\n/,/};ba'
share|improve this answer

This might work for you:

cut -d' ' -f5 file | paste -d',' -s
+12.0,+15.5,+9.0,+13.5

or

sed '/^.*\(+[^ ]*\).*/{s//\1/;H};${x;s/\n/,/g;s/.//p};d' file
+12.0,+15.5,+9.0,+13.5
share|improve this answer

try this:

sedSelectNumbers='s".* \(+[0-9]*[.][0-9]*\) .*"\1,"'
sedClearLastComma='s"\(.*\),$"\1"'
cat file.txt |sed "$sedSelectNumbers" |tr -d "\n" |sed "$sedClearLastComma"

the good thing is the easy part of deleting newline "\n" characters!

EDIT: another great way to join lines into a single line with sed is this: |sed ':a;N;$!ba;s/\n/ /g' got from here.

share|improve this answer
    
That EDIT is awesome - +1! –  JoeG Aug 30 '13 at 13:34

With perl:

fg@erwin ~ $ perl -ne 'push @l, (split(/\s+/))[1]; END { print join(",", @l) . "\n" }' <<EOF
something1:    +12.0   (some unnecessary trailing data (this must go))
something2:    +15.5   (some more unnecessary trailing data)
something4:    +9.0   (some other unnecessary data)
something1:    +13.5  (blah blah blah)
EOF

+12.0,+15.5,+9.0,+13.5
share|improve this answer

You can also do it with two sed calls:

$ cat file.txt 
something1:    +12.0   (some unnecessary trailing data (this must go))
something2:    +15.5   (some more unnecessary trailing data)
something4:    +9.0   (some other unnecessary data)
something1:    +13.5  (blah blah blah)
$ sed 's/^[^:]*: *\([+0-9.]\+\) .*/\1/' file.txt | sed -e :a -e '$!N; s/\n/,/; ta'
+12.0,+15.5,+9.0,+13.5

First sed call removes uninteresting data, and the second join all lines.

share|improve this answer

You can also print like this:

Just awk: using printf

bash-3.2$ cat sample.log
something1:    +12.0   (some unnecessary trailing data (this must go))
something2:    +15.5   (some more unnecessary trailing data)
something4:    +9.0   (some other unnecessary data)
something1:    +13.5  (blah blah blah)

bash-3.2$ awk ' { if($2 != "") { if(NR==1) { printf $2 } else { printf "," $2 } } }' sample.log
+12.0,+15.5,+9.0,+13.5
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.