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I have several nested enums similar to the following. I want to have an isValid() function defined as close as possible to the enum definition. Actual code is more verbose with multiple levels of nested namespaces and structs.

struct S
{
    enum E { V1, V2 };
    /* ????? */ bool isValid(E e) { return e==V1 || e==V2; }
};

template <typename Enum>
bool legalValue(Enum e)
{  
    return isValid(e);
}

Is it possible to make this code work without having to place isValid() in the global namespace?

Please don't comment on whether isValid() is good practice. This question is just as applicable for someone wanting to override operator<<() to be able to stream enum values meaningfully. In that case, is there any way the essence of operator<<() can be located within the body of struct S?

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1  
I'm not sure what the problem is here. Just make the isValid() function static, and change the legalValue() function to do return S::isValid(e);, and I think this should compile... –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 3 '12 at 15:41
    
The idea is that legalValue<Enum>() should work for any enum that has an associated isValid() function. It doesn't work for enums nested with class or struct. –  paperjam Jan 3 '12 at 15:43
    
Try putting the enum inside a namespace, instead of a struct. This way, ADL should kick in (I have not tested it), and you should be able to call isValid no matter in where namespace the enum is declared. –  paercebal Jan 3 '12 at 15:44
1  
Ah ok. So, more generally, you have code like struct S { enum E; bool foo(E); }; struct T { enum F; bool foo(F); };. You want a template that will do the "correct" thing given either S::E or T::F? –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 3 '12 at 15:46
1  
@paperjam: In my case, the natural home is inside a struct : Then try putting the function outside the struct, with its parameter being S::E instead of plain E. –  paercebal Jan 3 '12 at 15:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No, you'll have to move isValid out of the struct. The enum definition can stay inside it, though.

struct S
{
    enum E { V1, V2 };
};

bool isValid(S::E e) { return e == S::V1 || e == S::V2; }

template <typename Enum>
bool legalValue(Enum e)
{
    return isValid(e);
}
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One of the OP's stipulations was "Is it possible to make this code work without having to place isValid() in the global namespace?"... –  Oli Charlesworth Jan 3 '12 at 15:48
    
Thanks, but I was asking if there's a solution other than this. –  paperjam Jan 3 '12 at 15:48
1  
@OliCharlesworth: and I guess the answer is no; updated the answer, although I can't cite chorus and verse from the Standard. –  larsmans Jan 3 '12 at 15:49
    
@paperjam: why would you want an answer other than this? Were you just hoping for another possibility since you'd already thought of this? –  Mooing Duck Jan 3 '12 at 20:32
    
Because I have deeply nested structs and I want isValid() to be close to the enum definition. –  paperjam Jan 3 '12 at 21:13

It is not possible to find S from S::E.

If S were a namespace, Koenig lookup would find isValid even if it is not part of the global namespace, but I think that's not what you mean.

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If this is for standard C++, i.e. for C++2011, you could forward declare the nested enumeration:

struct S { enum E: int; };

enum S::E: int { V1, V2 };
bool isValid(S::E e) { return e == S::V1 || S::V2; }

Of course, you also wouldn't need to nest the enumeration into a struct to avoid pollution of the enclosing scope: instead you'd use

enum class S { V1, V2 };
bool isValid(S e) { return e == S::V1 || S::V2; }

Using V1 or V2 unqualified would be illegal.

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These might be technical points, but another option from making isValid global is to overload (or specialize)legalValue.

struct S
{
    enum E { V1, V2 };
    static bool isValid(E e) { return e==V1 || e==V2; }
};
bool legalValue(S::E e) { return S::isValid(e); }

template <typename Enum>
bool legalValue(Enum e) { return isValid(e); }

Another option is to make isValid a global friend. Though this differs in almost no way from it just being a free global function.

struct S
{
    enum E { V1, V2 };
    friend bool isValid(E e) { return e==V1 || e==V2; }
};
template <typename Enum>
bool legalValue(Enum e) { return isValid(e); }
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