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I had a head-scratcher yesterday.

Basically I had an associative array of some data with string keys(containing numeric values, but still, quoted strings) to go in a <select> box as options. I wanted to prepend a placeholder value to the select box's options.

I attempted to use array_merge:

$placeholder = "Month";
$source = array
(
    '01' => '01 - January',
    '02' => '02 - February',
    '03' => '03 - March',
    '04' => '04 - April',
    '05' => '05 - May',
    '06' => '06 - June',
    '07' => '07 - July',
    '08' => '08 - August',
    '09' => '09 - September',
    '10' => '10 - October',
    '11' => '11 - November',
    '12' => '12 - December'
);

$source = array_merge(array('' => $placeholder), $source);

And I was seeing weird results -- the resultant $source array was similar to the following:

(
    '' => 'Month',
    '01' => '01 - January',
    '02' => '02 - February',
    '03' => '03 - March',
    '04' => '04 - April',
    '05' => '05 - May',
    '06' => '06 - June',
    '07' => '07 - July',
    '08' => '08 - August',
    '09' => '09 - September',
    0 => '10 - October',
    1 => '11 - November',
    2 => '12 - December'
);

Note that it began using what appear to be auto-incrementing integer keys for October through December for some reason.

I can replace the array_merge call with this:

$source = array('' => $placeholder) + $source;

And the array doesn't get rekeyed and everything is fine, but I don't understand what's happening under the scenes in the array_merge case.

Can anyone please explain what was happening to my array keys when I used array_merge? Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
What did you expect to happen? –  Neal Jan 3 '12 at 16:07
    
I expected my array keys to be maintained. –  ashgromnies Jan 3 '12 at 16:08
4  
From the docs: "Values in the input array with numeric keys will be renumbered with incrementing keys starting from zero." I guess that '01' is not determined as being numeric by the function's implementation. (c.f. is_numeric('01')) –  cmbuckley Jan 3 '12 at 16:09
    
is_numeric('01') and is_numeric('10') both return true values -- why would the key for '10' change after the merge but not the key for '01'? –  ashgromnies Jan 3 '12 at 16:12
    
Because whatever logic the implementation uses behind the scenes is not the same logic as used by is_numeric. –  cmbuckley Jan 3 '12 at 16:20

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Problem doesn't come from the array_merge() function.

If you print $source before merging, you'll have this :

array(12) {
  ["01"]=>
  string(12) "01 - January"
  ["02"]=>
  string(13) "02 - February"
  // ...
}

Try to rename your first key '01' to '1', You will have the following return :

array(12) {
  [1]=>
  string(12) "01 - January"
  ["02"]=>
  string(13) "02 - February"
  // ...
}

PHP auto convert your key to integer. But I can't say you why It does it.

EDIT :

I have found the answer on php.net (PHP.net) :

A key may be either an integer or a string. If a key is the standard representation of an integer, it will be interpreted as such (i.e. "8" will be interpreted as 8, while "08" will be interpreted as "08"). Floats in key are truncated to integer. The indexed and associative array types are the same type in PHP, which can both contain integer and string indices.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Good answer, though a smaller example would suffice ;) –  Felix Kling Jan 3 '12 at 16:21

It's explained very clearly in the manual:

Don't forget that numeric keys will be renumbered!

The keys not starting with a '0' are seen as numeric by PHP -- and thus renumbered.

share|improve this answer
    
but is_numeric('01') and is_numeric('10') both return true values –  ashgromnies Jan 3 '12 at 16:15
2  
PHP is looking for a literal integer not just a "numeric" value, thus 1 != "1" –  Aknosis Jan 3 '12 at 16:17
    
Hmm, strange indeed. There's some stuff in the comments about this as well. –  Rijk Jan 3 '12 at 16:18
    
Aknosis -- then why is '10' a literal integer even though it's quoted? –  ashgromnies Jan 3 '12 at 16:20
    
Corum's edit at the bottom has the exact answer. –  Rijk Jan 3 '12 at 16:21

A couple of points in the docs lead to the explanation for this:

From array_merge:

Values in the input array with numeric keys will be renumbered with incrementing keys starting from zero.

And from Arrays:

A key may be either an integer or a string. If a key is the standard representation of an integer, it will be interpreted as such (i.e. "8" will be interpreted as 8, while "08" will be interpreted as "08").

This explains why the first keys are not seen as numeric keys, and hence they are not re-indexed. Your other keys are seen as numeric keys.

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