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I noticed that when you commit or checkout files using Git in a Windows environment, the file attributes are not preserved (for example hidden or read-only). If I commit a hidden file and then I check it out on another computer, the file is no more hidden. Is it possible to make Git recognize Windows file attributes?

Thanks.

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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

No. Git doesn't track full UNIX permissions either, it just remembers the executable bit for convenience. As to why — it's a version control system, designed to track primarily source code. Which makes that feature downright useless (not to mention 'hidden' attribute is quite useless on its own, too).

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Ok, thank you for the clear answer. I have few hidden and read-only files in my project but I will change them by hand if necessary. –  StockBreak Jan 3 '12 at 16:25
    
I would like this feature too, it is not "downright useless". For example, the Unity game development environment creates a sidecar ".meta" file for managing it's scene database. These files need to be revisioned, but no human ever needs to see them. –  yoyo Jan 23 '12 at 18:38
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You can use the post-checkout client-side hook to make any changes you need to make. In your case, you'd use it to run a script which sets the Windows file attributes you want.

ProGit describes this in general terms in the "Other Client Hooks" paragraph:

Customizing Git Hooks

Also, see githooks man page.

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Thanks, I will look into the book! –  StockBreak Jan 3 '12 at 16:27
    
After research, please consider accepting my answer instead. –  wadesworld Jan 3 '12 at 16:28
    
@wadesworld Could you provide example on the hook on windows? –  checksum Dec 26 '13 at 17:56
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