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---array $points----

Array
    (
        [0] => Array
            (
                [0] => 2011-10-02 05:30:00
                [1] => 20
            )

        [1] => Array
            (
                [0] => 2011-10-04 09:30:00
                [1] => 12
            )

        [2] => Array
            (
                [0] => 2011-10-01 13:30:00
                [1] => 25
            )

        [3] => Array
            (
                [0] => 2011-10-03 02:30:00
                [1] => 31
            )

    )

I have an array at above and would like to sort this array by time. Then I used the code as following to sort and result is correct. However, if I changed the code time[$key] = $val[0] to $time = $val[0], the result is wrong.

Is there anyone can explain this to me? Many thanks!

foreach($points as $key=>$val){

        $time[$key] = $val[0];

        array_multisort($time, SORT_ASC, $points);
    }
share|improve this question
    
Try this test: Remove the last line (array_mu...), comment it out or something, and then print out $time after the foreach loop using the statement time[$key] = $val[0]. Next, change the line to $time = $val[0] and see what $time produces after the loop. –  ladaghini Jan 3 '12 at 16:20
    
This is because of the way array_multisort works. It sorts multiple arrays, and when the $time array is sorted, the $points array is re-ordered according to the array indices in $time. The array_multisort should come after the foreach, though. –  cmbuckley Jan 3 '12 at 16:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

array_multisort sorts more than one array at once. However, it works on an array of columns, so the foreach loop is needed to get a column of the times. After building up this list, you can then perform the multisort. The $points array is ordered according to the indices in $times, as per this example in the docs.

However, you don't need to perform the sort inside the foreach, as that means the sort happens 4 times (in your example). It only needs to happen once:

foreach ($points as $key => $val) {
    $time[$key] = $val[0];
}

array_multisort($time, SORT_ASC, $points);
share|improve this answer

The function ausort() takes a comparison callback function. You can use this to compare two timestamps.

$arr = array(
        array('2011-10-02 05:30:00','20'),
        array('2011-10-04 09:30:00','12'),
        array('2011-10-01 13:30:00','25'),
        array('2011-10-03 02:30:00','31')
);

function timecomp($a,$b)
{
    // Subtracting the UNIX timestamps from each other.
    // Returns a negative number if $b is a date before $a,
    // otherwise positive.
    return strtotime($b[0])-strtotime($a[0]);
}
uasort($arr,'timecomp');

print_r($arr);

The above code will return

(
    [1] => Array
        (
            [0] => 2011-10-04 09:30:00
            [1] => 12
        )

    [3] => Array
        (
            [0] => 2011-10-03 02:30:00
            [1] => 31
        )

    [0] => Array
        (
            [0] => 2011-10-02 05:30:00
            [1] => 20
        )

    [2] => Array
        (
            [0] => 2011-10-01 13:30:00
            [1] => 25
        )

)
share|improve this answer
    
And how does this script NOT add unnecessary overhead? :P The time strings are already sortable, the entire thing you do with walking the array and converting them to timestamps is ridiculous. Plus, you've just invented a new $arr structure or something? I didn't find that in the original post. Thanks for the downvote. –  Rijk Jan 3 '12 at 16:26
    
@Rijk This site is for helping, not bashing. I was given you constructive criticism on your code. If there is some overhead, please tell me exactly where it can be improved. And no, I'm not creating a new $arr structure. –  kba Jan 3 '12 at 16:33
    
Either I totally misunderstood the question, or I already told you. It's in my answer as well. –  Rijk Jan 3 '12 at 16:36
    
@Rijk No, your answer changes the structure, mine does not, so I don't see how my answer deserves a downvote. –  kba Jan 3 '12 at 16:39
    
The question doesn't actually ask for how to do it. The OP's code already does it. The question is asking for an explanation as to why. –  cmbuckley Jan 3 '12 at 16:41

What you want to do is (basic idea):

foreach($points as $key=>$val){
     $time[$val[1]] = $val[0]; // $time will be an array of [ point => time ] pairs
}
asort( $time ); // sorts the array and maintains indexes

After this you have an array of point => time pairs, sorted by time. To get just the points, for instance do

$points = array_keys( $time );
share|improve this answer
    
There is no need to do ksort() inside your loop, that just adds extra unnecessary overhead. Also, you're completely changing the structure of the array. –  kba Jan 3 '12 at 16:17
    
You were right about the in the loop thing, though. –  Rijk Jan 3 '12 at 16:30

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