Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We were having the (never ending) underscore prefix versus no underscore prefix debate on member variables and someone mentioned that is you use "this." instead of "-", your code will be slower due to the "." in "this.". Is this true and can anyone quantify this?

share|improve this question
6  
Did you write a sample with and without this? Did you measure it? What did you learn? –  S.Lott May 16 '09 at 2:46
    
@S.Lott - good for you - there are far too many questions asked here which could be answered quickly with some easy tests. –  dsteele May 16 '09 at 2:54
1  
Jeff would kick you in the nuts for saying that, dsteele. –  Will May 17 '09 at 18:59

5 Answers 5

up vote 27 down vote accepted

No, that makes no sense at all. Just look at the IL, and kick that developer in the ass.

Also FWIW, I like the underscore in member variables.

share|improve this answer
4  
maaaan... underscores?? :p I've never liked underscores period.. since long before I even knew what computer programming was! –  DeadHead May 16 '09 at 2:49
4  
I agree except for underscores. I HATE them. I think they make it harder to read (though intellisense can be easier to navigate if you're not using this.) –  Jeff Yates May 16 '09 at 2:49
4  
The underscore prefix is wonderful. I find it makes it easy to differentiate between locals and members. –  TheSoftwareJedi May 16 '09 at 2:53
3  
I agree with underscores. All my class level private members have underscores. It brings the variables to the top of intellisense list and it separates them from variables the local method level variables. –  Chuck Conway May 16 '09 at 2:54
9  
If your editor can't color locals different from members, you need a new editor. Any human convention is fallible and a stupid compensation for inadequate tools. –  Bill K May 16 '09 at 2:55

There doesn't seem to be difference when using the this keywords. If you have the following code:

class Class3
{
    private long id;

    public void DoWork()
    {
        id = 1;
        this.id = 2;
    }
}

When you run it through reflector you will see the following output:

internal class Class3
{
    // Fields
    private long id;

    // Methods
    public void DoWork()
    {
        this.id = 1L;
        this.id = 2L;
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Seems to me that "this." is a disambiguator at compile time. It tells the compiler the scope of the variable. It may be unnecessary, since the compiler will need to figure out scope in any case. But I can't imagine there is any performance downside, perhaps even a microscopic upside as you are "hinting".

Once the code is compiled (ie, at runtime), I imagine "this." is utterly irrelevant.

So it's a style choice. Some people prefer terseness. I like "this." because it adds clarity, when used correctly. It tells other developers where a function or property lives. I use it for any public method or property. I don't usually use it with private members.

Juval Lowy has a very nice C# style guide here: http://www.idesign.net/

share|improve this answer

Variables represent locations in memory. When compiled a 100character variable and a one letter variable are both converted into numbers. In the same way special characters are translated and wont make any difference on the speed.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually that's not completely true... the variable names must kept somewhere in the compiled assembly, since disassemblers like Reflector are able to show them... But anyway, it has no impact on how the code is executed... –  Thomas Levesque May 16 '09 at 17:01
    
but if I am not mistaken to do that you need the pdb files. My point is that at a low level you'll have tokens that only the compiler will understand irrelevant to the size of the original variable name. –  Marcom May 18 '09 at 12:26

Who needs underscores when you got camelCasing? Also I got a say that what you doing sounds like a crazy idea.

share|improve this answer
    
I use camelCasing for local variables, and leading underscores for fields –  Thomas Levesque May 16 '09 at 16:59

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.