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I have this page I'm creating and I can't seem to get a simple jQuery click to work at all. Tried hover, tried click, tried mouseover, etc. No luck. jQuery 1.7.1 is installed. Not sure why the functionality is not working. Anyone have any thoughts. Link and javascript to follow. Thanks in advance.

http://www.bigideaadv.com/adaptive/

    $("#menu_show").click(function () {
        alert('Works!');
    });

Dave

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5  
Try to not load multiple jQuery files.. Line 56 (original), Line 106 (again, effectively removes all jQuery plugins). –  Rob W Jan 3 '12 at 18:08
    
Look no further than Rob's answer as your first step. If there are any problems after that, revisit. Antisanity's answer could be reasonable, too, but it's guesswork until you resolve what Rob found. –  Greg Pettit Jan 3 '12 at 18:12
    
Your site is not loading for me at all... err wait, there it is... it just takes forever. And like the previous commenter mentioned, you're loading jQuery more than once... this is never good. –  Sparky Jan 3 '12 at 18:15
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8 Answers

up vote 62 down vote accepted

#menu_show wasn't in the DOM when your script ran.

The position of your DOM-reliant script can have a profound effect upon its behavior. The document is parsed from top to bottom. Elements are added to the DOM and scripts are executed as they're encountered. This means that order matters. Typically, scripts can't find elements which appear later in the markup because those elements haven't yet been added to the DOM.

Consider the following markup (fiddle); the first <script> fails to find the <div> while the second <script> succeeds:

<script>
    console.log(document.getElementById("test-div")); // null
</script>

<div id="test-div">test div</div>

<script>
    console.log(document.getElementById("test-div")); // <div id="test-div">...
</script>

So, what should you do? You've got a few options:


Option 1: Move your script further down the page, just before the closing body tag. Organized in this fashion, the rest of the document is parsed before your script is executed (sample):

        <a class="menu_show">test</a>
        <script>
             $(".menu_show").click(function(){
                 alert("test");
             });
        </script>
    </body> <!-- closing body tag -->
</html>

Note: Placing scripts at the bottom is generally considered a best practice.


Option 2: Defer your script until the DOM has been completely parsed, using ready() (sample):

$(document).ready(function(){    
    $(".menu_show").click(function () {
        alert('Works!');
    });
});

Note: You could simply bind to DOMContentLoaded or window.onload but each has its caveats. jQuery's ready() delivers a hybrid solution.


Option 3: Event delegation

Delegated events have the advantage that they can process events from descendant elements that are added to the document at a later time.

When an element raises an event (provided that it's a bubbling event and nothing stops its propagation), each parent in that element's ancestry receives the event as well. That allows us to attach a handler to an existing element and sample events as they bubble up from its descendants. Descendants added at a later time will send their events up to the handler waiting on the parent. All we have to do is check the event to see whether it was raised by the desired element and, if so, run our code.

jQuery's on() performs that logic for us. We simply provide an event name, a selector for the desired descendant, and an event handler (sample):

<script>
    $(document).on("click", "#test-div", function(e) {
        alert(this.innerHTML);
    });
</script>
<div id="test-div">test div</div>

Note: Typically, this pattern is reserved for elements which didn't exist at load-time or to avoid attaching a large amount of handlers. In your particular case, Option 1 and Option 2 are more appropriate.

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1  
You're a saver. Thanks for going into detail. Placing js at the end of the page made me realize I'd forgotten about ready. –  James Poulson Aug 21 '13 at 6:57
1  
Option 3 helped me with a problem I've had for days. Was ready to give up on it –  AdRock Dec 16 '13 at 11:07
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Try:

$("#menu_show").on("click", function (e) {
    alert('Works!');
});

This allows it to bind once the page is fully loaded.

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Using 'live' works for me when my view is rendered in backend view. –  angelokh Mar 25 '13 at 7:07
    
not work for me.$("#btnCreateDatabase").on("click", function(e){ createDatabase(); }); –  Scott 混合理论 May 13 '13 at 6:51
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Check if any other element is over your element and your element's z-index is very low compared to that element. If so just increase your element's z-index.

Otherwise, try this:

always unbind any event before binding it,its clean and proper way
 $("#menu_show").unbind('click');
 $("#menu_show").bind('click',function () {
        alert('Works!');
    });
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it works great for me +1 –  Sreenath Plakkat Nov 9 '12 at 4:10
    
One example of this is when using zeroclipboard, there is an overlay on top of your target. –  lulalala Apr 7 at 6:59
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antisanity is right. The DOM is not ready. But instead of using ready you could also just move your <script> tag in which you set all the click and mouseover (etc) listeners all the way to the end of the DOM right before the <body/> tag. Not really necessary if you use $(document).ready but it is best practice to make sure the JS is not executed before the DOM is parsed entirely.

Because JS is exectuted as soon as the browser comes across the <script> and since it parses the document from top to bottom it executes your JavaScript before it actually creates the DOM.

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Look through CSS for pointer-events: none;

Makes [the element] non-reactive to any mouse events such as dragging, hovering, clicking etc

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2  
Wow, I've never even heard of this before. +1 –  canon Jul 23 '13 at 22:15
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Another reason for an event not firing is when the "disabled" property/attribute is set on the button, which will prevent it being clickabled and therefore not firing the click event from it.

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Try to write your code in document.ready() function so that it apply when page is fully loaded.

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or TRY too:

$("#menu_show").attr('onclick', 'alert("teste")');
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