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I have a server-equipment configuration where I need to change the equip date config, using UDP. The server is written in Java and the equipment, in Delphi.

So, the flow of the data is this:

Java server (Java date) -> UDP (integer date) -> Delphi equipment (Delphi date)

The problem is that when I pass the date as an integer, java calculates miliseconds from 1970, and Delphi, seconds. I pass then the date as following: today.getTime() / 1000, but the equipment understands this as a 2008 date, when we're on 2012.

I can change the Java code, but the equipment is 3rd party and I don't have access to it's source code.

There's difference between Java and Delphi date parsing that allow this discrepancy?

EDIT: Thanks to MДΓΓ БДLL I noticed I was multiplying by 1000 instead of dividing by it, I now have a better date, but still wrong (was somewhen in 2033, now it's in 2008).

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4  
I don't fully understand. You need to go from milliseconds since 1970 to seconds (since 1970?) but you're multiplying by 1000? Milliseconds => seconds means divide by 1000. –  Matt Ball Jan 3 '12 at 18:19
3  
I don't know of any Date types in Delphi that are seconds since 1970. Are you sure this is a Delphi question? –  Marcus Adams Jan 3 '12 at 18:27
    
Doh! I was indeed multiplying instead of dividing... but it still didn't fix the problem, see the edit –  Rodrigo Castro Jan 3 '12 at 18:36
2  
@Marcus - it is int64; see UnixToDateTime function from DateUtils.pas –  user246408 Jan 3 '12 at 18:46
    
The time "in Delphi" is the same as the rest of Greece. ;) maps.google.co.uk/maps/place?q=Delphi,+greece –  Peter Lawrey Jan 3 '12 at 18:53

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

A Unix time stamp is the same as the one used in Java. Delphi's TDateTime, on the other hand, is based on a starting date of 12:01 AM on 12/30/1899 (it's a COM compatibility thing), so some conversion is necessary. These functions will do it; I've also added a quick piece of test code to show the conversion works correctly both ways.

const
  UnixStartDate = 25569.0;

function DateTimeToUnixTime(const ADateTime: TDateTime): Cardinal;
begin
  Result := Round(ADateTime - UnixStartDate) * 86400;
end;

function UnixTimeToDateTime(const UnixDate: Cardinal): TDateTime;
begin
  Result := UnixDate / 86400 + UnixStartDate;
end;

procedure TForm1.Button1Click(Sender: TObject);
var  StartDate: TDateTime;
  UnixDate: Cardinal;
begin
  StartDate := Date();
  Memo1.Lines.Add('Start Date: ' + DateToStr(StartDate));
  UnixDate := DateTimeToUnixTime(StartDate);
  Memo1.Lines.Add('DateTimeToUnixTime = ' + IntToStr(UnixDate));
  Memo1.Lines.Add('UnixTimeToDateTime = ' + DateToStr(UnixTimeToDateTime(UnixDate)));
end;
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For all the non-colonials (? I think the british are responsible for that format?) who have no idea what 12:01 AM is.. it's 0:01 NOT 12:01 ;) –  Voo Jan 3 '12 at 20:10
    
It's 0001 or 0:01 for those people using 24 hour time; in 12-hour (AM/PM) format it's 12:01AM as I said. :) –  Ken White Jan 3 '12 at 20:15
    
Yeah I just wanted to make it sound a bit more fun ;) But as someone who grew up with the 24hour system myself I thought it warranted some mention as you wouldn't believe how many people (at least in Germany/Austria) would intuitively interpret 12:01AM as 12:01 - or would be stumped why exactly any value larger than 12:00 is allowed in a 12hour time system to begin with. –  Voo Jan 3 '12 at 20:37
    
@KenWhite: -1. Unix timestamps are expressed in seconds from the Unix epoch, but Java timestamps are expressed in milliseconds from the same epoch. Your DateTimeToUnixTime() function encodes Jan 3 2012 3:55:44 PM GMT as 1325635200, but the correct value in Unix is 1325606144 and in Java is 1325606144000. UnixTimeToDateTime(1325635200) is then returning Jan 4 2012 00:00:00 GMT. I just updated my answer with examples that produce correct values. –  Remy Lebeau Mar 6 at 1:17

Delphi's DateUtils unit has UnixToDateTime() and DateTimeToUnix() functions for converting between TDateTime and Unix timestamps, which are expressed as seconds from the Unix epoch (Jan 1 1970 00:00:00 GMT):

// 1325606144 = Jan 3 2012 3:55:44 PM GMT

uses
  DateUtils;

var
  DT: TDateTime;
  Unix: Int64;
begin
  DT := UnixToDateTime(1325606144);
  // returns Jan 3 2012 3:55:44 PM

  Unix := DateTimeToUnix(EncodeDate(2012, 1, 3) + EncodeTime(15, 55, 44, 0));
  // returns 1325606144
end;

Java's Date class, on the other hand, is based on milliseconds from the Unix epoch instead. That is easy to take into account, though:

uses
  DateUtils;

function JavaToDateTime(Value: Int64): TDateTime;
begin
  Result := UnixToDateTime(Value div 1000);
end;

function DateTimeToJava(const Value: TDateTime): Int64;
begin
  Result := DateTimeToUnix(Value) * 1000;
end;

Alternatively:

uses
  SysUtils, DateUtils;

// UnixDateDelta is defined in SysUtils...

function JavaToDateTime(Value: Int64): TDateTime;
begin
  Result := IncMilliSecond(UnixDateDelta, Value);
 end;

function DateTimeToJava(const Value: TDateTime): Int64;
begin
  Result := MilliSecondsBetween(UnixDateDelta, Value);
  if Value < UnixDateDelta then
    Result := -Result;
end;

Either way:

// 1325606144000 = Jan 3 2012 3:55:44 PM GMT

var
  DT: TDateTime;
  Java: Int64;
begin
  DT := JavaToDateTime(1325606144000);
  // returns Jan 3 2012 3:55:44 PM

  Java := DateTimeToJava(EncodeDate(2012, 1, 3) + EncodeTime(15, 55, 44, 0));
  // returns 1325606144000
end;
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This didn't work for me. The function returned TDateTime values from the year 43,000. –  TomC Mar 3 at 19:32
    
Then you were not using it correctly. –  Remy Lebeau Mar 3 at 22:52
    
Feel free to enlighten me as to the correct usage rather than to state I was using it incorrectly. I had success using the JavaToDelphiDateTime function from the SuperObject package which is used by Delphi-OOP. –  TomC Mar 5 at 23:25
2  
I have updated my answer with examples. I did not take seconds vs milliseconds into account before. –  Remy Lebeau Mar 6 at 1:09
    
Very usefull. Thanks. Note that UnixToDateTime and DateTimeToUnix both have an optional ReturnUTC parameter that is true by default. –  Regis St-Gelais Jul 9 at 20:58

As far I know Java date is based on UTC so you also have to convert local time from/to UTC. These functions use milliseconds, adapt the code to your needs.

function TzSpecificLocalTimeToSystemTime(
  lpTimeZoneInformation: PTimeZoneInformation;
  lpLocalTime, lpUniversalTime: PSystemTime): BOOL; stdcall; external 'kernel32.dll';

function SystemTimeToTzSpecificLocalTime(
  lpTimeZoneInformation: PTimeZoneInformation;
  lpUniversalTime, lpLocalTime: PSystemTime): BOOL; stdcall; external 'kernel32.dll';

function JavaToDelphiDateTime(const dt: int64): TDateTime;
var
  t: TSystemTime;
begin
  DateTimeToSystemTime(25569 + (dt / 86400000), t);
  SystemTimeToTzSpecificLocalTime(nil, @t, @t);
  Result := SystemTimeToDateTime(t);
end;

function DelphiToJavaDateTime(const dt: TDateTime): int64;
var
  t: TSystemTime;
begin
  DateTimeToSystemTime(dt, t);
  TzSpecificLocalTimeToSystemTime(nil, @t, @t);
  Result := Round((SystemTimeToDateTime(t) - 25569) * 86400000)
end;
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Get the JSON superobect package from www.progdigy.com and extract the functions JavaToDelphiDateTime and v.v. from the source files.

Updated 3 Mar 2014:

Progdigy.com no longer serves these files. Get the files from Google. The official 1.2.4 ZIP file in the download section http://code.google.com/p/superobject/downloads/list dates from 2010, but the individual files in http://code.google.com/p/superobject/source/browse have updates up until Oct 2012.

You must use those updated files because there was an obscure error in datetime conversions happening around the switch to daylight savings time in leapyears.

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