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I'm new to this website and not a great programmer, I've been stuck on this one part of my work for a while.

I am asked to write a separate class to do something, so I figured I would do this for a to-do list (use a text box to enter data into a list and then have another list for completed tasks, use a button to transfer between).

I have been able to get data added into my to-do list and my code will successfully remove from the to-do list and place in the "Done" list through clicking a button.

My code doesn't work when I put it in a new class.

Here's the code of the new class:

public class ToDo : Form1

    {
        public void Remove()
        {

            for (int i = 0; i <= (lstToDo.SelectedItems.Count - 1); i++)
            {

                lstDone.Items.Add(lstToDo.SelectedItems[i]);
                lstToDo.Items.Remove(lstToDo.SelectedItems[i]);

            }
        }
    }

and here is the code from Form1 which I think I am attempting to call from when I click on a button:

public void btnRemoveToDo_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {

            ToDo todo = new ToDo();
            todo.Remove();
        }

Any help that you can provide is appreciated and I apologise for any confusion in my question!

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You may want to do some reading about Object Oriented (OO) programming; it would help you understand why what you are attempting is not working. –  Jesse Webb Jan 3 '12 at 18:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Before you moved it into the new class, I imagine your method looked like...

public void btnRemoveToDo_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    this.Remove();
}

When you moved it into a new class, you changed that code to...

ToDo todo = new ToDo();
todo.Remove();

That is creating a new instance of the class. To make it work, you would have to use the existing instance; this like so...

ToDO todo = (ToDo) this;
todo.Remove();

This isn't really optimal either though because it is a very awkward architecture. You are better to leave methods which utilize components of the form on the form class itself. If you want methods to process the data, extract the values out of the Form's components and then use the data as parameters to different classes' methods. That is more of a comment on general software architechture though and not really important to your specific problem.

EDIT
Casting the Form instance (this) as a ToDo instance won't work because Form1 does not inherit from ToDo as commented on.

You are better off moving the Remove() method back into Form1 class for now. My suggestion would be to try to learn a little bit more about Objects and Object Oriented Programming (OOP) before attempting to break out anything else into different classes.

The other thing you could try is making the Remove() method on the ToDo class take in anything it needs as parameters.

public void Remove(ListControl todoList, ListControl doneList)
{
    for (int i = 0; i <= (todoList.SelectedItems.Count - 1); i++)
    {
        doneList.Items.Add(todoList.SelectedItems[i]);
        todoList.Items.Remove(todoList.SelectedItems[i]);
    }
}

Then you would have to make your other method look like this...

public void btnRemoveToDo_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    ToDo toDo = new ToDo();
    toDo.Remove(lstToDo, lstDone);
}
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When I changed it to "(ToDo) this;" it gave me an error when I tried to remove from todo list and add to done list, the error said: Unable to cast object of type 'Coursework_Program.Form1' to type 'Coursework_program.ToDo'. –  Chrisosaurus Jan 3 '12 at 19:05
    
@Chrisosaurus - I have edited my answer to address your comment. –  Jesse Webb Jan 3 '12 at 21:43
    
Thanks for the help, unfortunately it still won't work for me, so I'll just work around this and create a class for something else! Thanks so much! –  Chrisosaurus Jan 4 '12 at 0:00
    
Nevermind, your code worked correctly after modifying a few things, my own fault, thank you! –  Chrisosaurus Jan 4 '12 at 0:19

you are making a new instance of the ToDo class, which does not carry over your selected items from your original Form1. I suspect that at the line:

        for (int i = 0; i <= (lstToDo.SelectedItems.Count - 1); i++)

lstToDo.SelectedItems is probably empty.

Without seeing all your code, it is hard to provide good suggestions, but the ToDo class probably does not need to extend Form1. The ToDo class should contain all your tasks internally, and track which are completed, and Form1 should have 1 instance of ToDo that it uses to display the data.

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If I don't use "ToDo : Form1" the ToDo class throws up errors saying the the list boxes don't exist. –  Chrisosaurus Jan 3 '12 at 19:02
    
Correct, because ToDo shouldn't be accessing the list boxes in your user interface. Form1 should be doing the job of binding data from your todo list to the user interface. Otherwise, there is no reason to move the Remove() method that you have into a separate ToDo class. If Remove() is going to interact with the user interface, specifically the list boxes, then Remove() should be in Form1. There is no reason to have a ToDo in that case. It probably comes down to the way you are approaching the problem and thinking about object oriented design. –  CodingWithSpike Jan 3 '12 at 21:46
    
Think about it this way; The ToDo class manages a todo list. As far as tasks, and what is completed or not completed. Form1 is managing relating the ToDo list's information to the user, not managing the actual ToDo list. There is a separation of concerns there. Form1 is concerned with the display of data, and ToDo is concerned with representing the list. –  CodingWithSpike Jan 3 '12 at 21:49
    
Thank you very much for clearing a lot of things up for me, I'll work around it and create a class for something else! Thanks so much! –  Chrisosaurus Jan 4 '12 at 0:00

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