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I know there has been alot of posts on this but it still confuses me why should you pass in an interface like IList and return an interface like IList back instead of the concrete list.

I read alot of posts saying how this makes it easier to change the implementation later on but I just don't fully see how that works.

Say if I have this method

  public class SomeClass
    {
        public bool IsChecked { get; set; }
    }

 public void LogAllChecked(IList<SomeClass> someClasses)
    {
        foreach (var s in someClasses)
        {
            if (s.IsChecked)
            {
                // log 
            }

        }
    }

I am not sure how in the future by using IList will help me out.

How about if I am already in the method? Should I still be using IList?

public void LogAllChecked(IList<SomeClass> someClasses)
    {
        //why not List<string> myStrings = new List<string>()
        IList<string> myStrings = new List<string>();

        foreach (var s in someClasses)
        {
            if (s.IsChecked)
            {
                myStrings.Add(s.IsChecked.ToString());
            }

        }
    }

What do I get for using IList now?

public IList<int> onlySomeInts(IList<int> myInts)
    {
        IList<int> store = new List<int>();
        foreach (var i in myInts)
        {
            if (i % 2 == 0)
            {
                store.Add(i);
            }
        }

        return store;
    }

how about now? Is there some new implementation of a list of int's that I will need to change out?

So basically I need to see some actual code examples of how if I where using IList would have solved some problem over just taking List into everything.

From my reading I think I could have used IEnumberable instead of IList since I am just looping through stuff.

Edit So I been playing around with some of my methods on how to do this. I am still not sure about the return type(if I should make it more concrete or an interface)

 public class CardFrmVm
    {
        public IList<TravelFeaturesVm> TravelFeaturesVm { get; set; }
        public IList<WarrantyFeaturesVm> WarrantyFeaturesVm { get; set; }

        public CardFrmVm()
        {
            WarrantyFeaturesVm = new List<WarrantyFeaturesVm>();
            TravelFeaturesVm = new List<TravelFeaturesVm>();
        }
}

 public class WarrantyFeaturesVm : AvailableFeatureVm
    {
    }

     public class TravelFeaturesVm : AvailableFeatureVm
    {

    }

      public class AvailableFeatureVm
    {
        public Guid FeatureId { get; set; }
        public bool HasFeature { get; set; }
        public string Name { get; set; }
    }


        private IList<AvailableFeature> FillAvailableFeatures(IEnumerable<AvailableFeatureVm> avaliableFeaturesVm)
        {
            List<AvailableFeature> availableFeatures = new List<AvailableFeature>();
            foreach (var f in avaliableFeaturesVm)
            {
                if (f.HasFeature)
                {
                                                    // nhibernate call to Load<>()
                    AvailableFeature availableFeature = featureService.LoadAvaliableFeatureById(f.FeatureId);
                    availableFeatures.Add(availableFeature);
                }
            }

            return availableFeatures;
        }

So I am right now returning IList for the simple fact that I will then add this to my domain model what has a property like this

public virtual IList<AvailableFeature> AvailableFeatures { get; set; }

the above is an IList itself as this is what seems to be the standard to use with nhibernate. Otherwise I might have returned IEnumberable back but not sure. Still can't figure out what the user would 100% need(that's where return a concrete has an advantage over).

Edit 2

I was also thinking what happens if I want to do pass by reference in my method?

private void FillAvailableFeatures(IEnumerable<AvailableFeatureVm> avaliableFeaturesVm, IList<AvailableFeature> toFill)
            {

                foreach (var f in avaliableFeaturesVm)
                {
                    if (f.HasFeature)
                    {
                                                        // nhibernate call to Load<>()
                        AvailableFeature availableFeature = featureService.LoadAvaliableFeatureById(f.FeatureId);
                        toFill.Add(availableFeature);
                    }
                }
            }

would I run into problems with this? Since could they not pass in an array(that has a fixed size)? Would it be better maybe for a concrete List?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 66 down vote accepted

There are three questions here: what type should I use for a formal parameter? What should I use for a local variable? and what should I use for a return type?

Formal parameters:

The principle here is do not ask for more than you need. IEnumerable<T> communicates "I need to get the elements of this sequence from beginning to end". IList<T> communicates "I need to get and set the elements of this sequence in arbitrary order". List<T> communicates "I need to get and set the elements of this sequence in arbitrary order and I only accept lists; I do not accept arrays."

By asking for more than you need, you (1) make the caller do unnecessary work to satisfy your unnecessary demands, and (2) communicate falsehoods to the reader. Ask only for what you're going to use. That way if the caller has a sequence, they don't need to call ToList on it to satisfy your demand.

Local variables:

Use whatever you want. It's your method. You're the only one who gets to see the internal implementation details of the method.

Return type:

Same principle as before, reversed. Offer the bare minimum that your caller requires. If the caller only requires the ability to enumerate the sequence, only give them an IEnumerable<T>.

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3  
How do you know what the caller needs though. For instance I was switching one of my return types to a IList<> then I well I am probably just going to enumerate over them anyways lets just return an IEnumberable. Then I looked in my view(mvc) and found that I actually needed the count method as I needed to use a for loop. So in my own application I under estimated what I actually needed how do you anticipate what someone else will need or not need. –  chobo2 Jan 3 '12 at 22:00
    
@chobo2: In your specific example, LINQ Count works in O(1) if your IEnumerable is an ICollection. Of course, you could also just use a foreach loop. –  Brian Jan 3 '12 at 22:42
1  
@chobo2: Well, how do you anticipate what methods the caller will need? That seems like the problem to solve first. Presumably somehow you have a way of knowing what methods to write for the people who are going to be calling them. Ask those people what they'd like the methods to return. Your question is fundamentally "how do I know what software to write?" You know by getting to know what problems your customer has to solve, and writing code that solves their problems. –  Eric Lippert Jan 3 '12 at 22:46
    
@Eric - you should update your answer for formal parameters to include an example of ICollection where you only need to add an item. Also your return type explanation should say something along the lines of 'offer only the bare minimum of what you allow the caller to perform'. If its a read only list return only IEnumerable, etc. –  Charles Lambert Jan 3 '12 at 22:47
3  
@kvb: Almost. Consider your first scenario. You can make an algorithmic improvement by doing items as IList<T> and if you get non-null, then use your improved code. That way you take advantage if you can, while still allowing the client flexibility in what they pass in. –  Eric Lippert Jan 4 '12 at 17:18
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The most practical reason I've ever seen was given by Jeffrey Richter in CLR via C#.

The pattern is to take the basest class or interface possible for your arguments and return the most specific class or interface possible for your return types. This gives your callers the most flexibility in passing in types to your methods and the most opportunities to cast/reuse the return values.

For example, the following method

public void PrintTypes(IEnumerable items) 
{ 
    foreach(var item in items) 
        Console.WriteLine(item.GetType().FullName); 
}

allows the method to be called passing in any type that can be cast to an enumerable. If you were more specific

public void PrintTypes(List items)

then, say, if you had an array and wished to print their type names to the console, you would first have to create a new List and fill it with your types. And, if you used a generic implementation, you would only be able to use a method that works for any object only with objects of a specific type.

When talking about return types, the more specific you are, the more flexible callers can be with it.

public List<string> GetNames()

you can use this return type to iterate the names

foreach(var name in GetNames())

or you can index directly into the collection

Console.WriteLine(GetNames()[0])

Whereas, if you were getting back a less specific type

public IEnumerable GetNames()

you would have to massage the return type to get the first value

Console.WriteLine(GetNames().OfType<string>().First());
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4  
Note that this advice contradicts Eric Lippert's answer in the recommendation for return types. Jeffrey Richter's approach gives the method's consumers the most flexibility to use the returned object however they like, while Eric's gives the method's maintainers the most flexibility to change the implementation without modifying the public surface of the method. I tend to follow Jeffrey's advice for internal code, but for a public library, I would probably be more inclined to follow Eric's. –  phoog Jan 3 '12 at 20:04
1  
@phoog: Considering where Eric is coming from, it wouldn't be surprising he is more cautious about breaking changes. But it is definitely a valid point. –  Will Jan 3 '12 at 20:06
    
Very tough. It seems like there is people for both sides(return bare min or not). I understand more why you do it for the parameters it helps stop from needless converting. I am still not sure what to do with the return type. –  chobo2 Jan 3 '12 at 22:16
    
@chobo2: Really, you just need to consider if you may need to change the return type in future if you specify something more exact rather than general. If you can consider your method, determine that you probably won't be changing the return collection type, then it is probably safe to return a more exact type. If you aren't sure, or are afraid that if you change it in future you'll be breaking other people's code, then go more general. –  Will Jan 3 '12 at 22:37
1  
+1 Trivia: this answer is a nice, CLR-specific example of Postel's Law. :) –  Dan J Jan 3 '12 at 23:42
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Short Answer:

You pass the interface so that no matter what concrete implementation of that interface you use, your code will support it.

If you use a concrete implementation of list, another implementation of the same list will not be supported by your code.

Read a bit on inheritance and polymorphism.

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Inside the method, you should use var, instead of IList or List. When your data source changes to come from a method instead, your onlySomeInts method will survive.

The reason to use IList instead of List as parameters, is because many things implement IList (List and [], as two examples), but only one thing implements List. It's more flexible to code to the interface.

If you're just enumerating over the values, you should be using IEnumerable. Every type of datatype that can hold more than one value implements IEnumerable (or should) and makes your method hugely flexible.

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10  
Saying he should use "var" is completely incorrect. It doesn't matter what he uses there - this is a style issue. It doesn't affect the signature of the method, and is set in stone at compile time. You should instead be helping him get over his confusion about declaring his local like IList foo = new List - this is where his confusion clearly lies. –  x0n Jan 3 '12 at 19:37
    
So basically you saying to take in IList just for the fact if they want to send in an array they don't have to do .ToList first? How about returning it? I don't understand what you mean by "method will survive" when using vars? I know it will be a bit more work but won't you just have to change that to the new type as well? So maybe IList<int> to IList<String>? –  chobo2 Jan 3 '12 at 19:40
    
True, the point of "use var" was more a suggestion to not worry about it inside the method itself and focus more on how it looks to consumers. –  insta Jan 3 '12 at 19:42
    
I agree with @x0n: var is severely over used and will not help make anything more clear. –  That Chuck Guy Jan 3 '12 at 19:42
    
@chobo2: to chat? –  insta Jan 3 '12 at 19:43
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Here's an example: I had a project once where our lists got very large, and resulting fragmentation of the large object heap was hurting performance. We replaced List with LinkedList. LinkedList does not contain an array, so all of a sudden, we had almost no use of the large object heap.

Mostly, we used the lists as IEnumerable<T>, anyway, so there was no further change needed. (And yes, I would recommend declaring references as IEnumerable if all you're doing is enumerating them.) In a couple of places, we needed the list indexer, so we wrote an inefficient IList<T> wrapper around the linked lists. We needed the list indexer infrequently, so the inefficiency was not a problem. If it had been, we could have provided some other implementation of IList, perhaps as a collection of small-enough arrays, that would have been more efficiently indexable while also avoiding large objects.

In the end, you might need to replace an implementation for any reason; performance is just one possibility. Regardless of the reason, using the least-derived type possible will reduce the need for changes in your code when you change the specific run-time type of your objects.

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IEnumerable<T> allows you to iterate through a collection. ICollection<T> builds on this and also allows for adding and removing items. IList<T> also allows for accessing and modifying them at a specific index. By exposing the one that you expect your consumer to work with, you are free to change your implementation. List<T> happens to implement all three of those interfaces.

If you expose your property as a List<T> or even an IList<T> when all you want your consumer to have is the ability to iterate through the collection. Then they could come to depend on the fact that they can modify the list. Then later if you decide to convert the actual data store from a List<T> to a Dictionary<T,U> and expose the dictionary keys as the actual value for the property (I have had to do exactly this before). Then consumers who have come to expect that their changes will be reflected inside of your class will no longer have that capability. That's a big problem! If you expose the List<T> as an IEnumerable<T> you can comfortably predict that your collection is not being modified externally. That is one of the powers of exposing List<T> as any of the above interfaces.

This level of abstraction goes the other direction when it belongs to method parameters. When you pass your list to a method that accepts IEnumerable<T> you can be sure that your list is not going to be modified. When you are the person implementing the method and you say you accept an IEnumerable<T> because all you need to do is iterate through that list. Then the person calling the method is free to call it with any data type that is enumerable. This allows your code to be used in unexpected, but perfectly valid ways.

From this it follows that your method implementation can represent its local variables however you wish. The implementation details are not exposed. Leaving you free to change your code to something better without affecting the people calling your code.

You cannot predict the future. Assuming that a property's type will always be beneficial as a List<T> is immediately limiting your ability to adapt to unforeseen expectations of your code. Yes, you may never change that data type from a List<T> but you can be sure that if you have to. Your code is ready for it.

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Using IList instead of List makes writing unit tests significantly easier. It allows you to use a 'Mocking' library to pass and return data.

The other general reason for using interfaces is to expose the minimum amount of knowledge necessary to the user of an object.

Consider the (contrived) case where I have a data object that implements IList.

public class MyDataObject : IList<int>
{
    public void Method1()
    {
       ...
    }
    // etc
}

Your functions above only care about being able to iterate over a list. Ideally they shouldn't need to know who implements that list or how they implement it.

In your example, IEnumerable is a better choice as you thought.

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It is always a good idea to reduce the dependencies between your code as much as possible.

Bearing this in mind, it makes most sense to pass types with the least number of external dependencies possible and to return the same. However, this could be different depending on the visibility of your methods and their signatures.

If your methods form part of an interface, the methods will need to be defined using types available to that interface. Concrete types will probably not be available to interfaces, so they would have to return non-concrete types. You would want to do this if you were creating a framework, for example.

However, if you are not writing a framework, it may be advantageous to pass parameter with the weakest possible types (i.e. base classes, interfaces, or even delegates) and return concrete types. That gives the caller the ability to do as much as possible with the returned object, even if it is cast as an interface. However, this makes the method more fragile, as any change to the returned object type may break the calling code. In practice though, that generally isn't a major problem.

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You accept an Interface as a parameter for a method because that allows the caller to submit different concrete types as arguments. Given your example method LogAllChecked, the parameter someClasses could be of various types, and for the person writing the method, all might be equivalent (i.e. you'd write the exact same code regardless of the type of the parameter). But for the person calling the method, it can make a huge difference -- if they have an array and you're asking for a list, they have to change the array to a list or v.v. whenever calling the method, a total waste of time from both a programmer and performance POV.

Whether you return an Interface or a concrete type depends upon what you want to let your callers do with the object you created -- this is an API design decision, and there's no hard and fast rule. You have to weigh their ability to make full use of the object against their ability to easily use a portion of the objects functionality (and of course whether you WANT them to be making full use of the object). For instance, if you return an IEnumerable, then you are limiting them to iterating -- they can't add or remove items from your object, they can only act against the objects. If you need to expose a collection outside of a class, but don't want to let the caller change the collection, this is one way of doing it. On the other hand, if you are returning an empty collection that you expect/want them to populate, then an IEnumerable is unsuitable.

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