Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a file named test1.cpp

namespace a {
int main1() {
    return 3;
}
}

And I have another file test2.cpp

#include <stdio.h>
using a::main1;
int main() {
    printf("%d", a::main1());
}

Then I got a compilation error saying 'a' has not been declared with g++. Please help me to find out what I missed here, and normally how to do this.

Thank you.

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You have to declare the namespace, class and function in a header file and include it in the test2.cpp file.

share|improve this answer
    
You could even declare the name space and class or function in the same file, but that is bad practice. Declarations should go into header files. – Basile Starynkevitch Jan 3 '12 at 20:11

You need to declare your a::main1 in a header file, call it test1.h, and then include that header in test2.h. Otherwise test2 has no way of knowing what you've decalared in test1.

test1.h

namespace a {
int main1();
}

test1.cpp

namespace a {
int main1() {
    return 3;
}
}

test2.cpp

#include <stdio.h>
#include test1.h
using a::main1;
int main() {
    printf("%d", a::main1());
}
share|improve this answer

Your function main1() is declared in the namespace 'a', so when you call it in the printf() you need to make sure the compiler knows what namespace to look it up in. There are two ways to do this (that I know of):

  1. You can explicitly call out the namespace using :: like you did:

    printf ("%d", a::main1());
    
  2. Or you can, somewhere above it's first use, tell the compiler to generally look for symbols in the 'a' namespace by using the line:

    using namespace a;
    

The compiler I'm using (MS Studio 2008) did not complain when I used both techniques together.

I believe the reason you got the error you did was that your "using" statement was not correctly formed for the compiler (see above).

share|improve this answer
    
surely his problem is that test2 doesn't include test1 so the namespace is unknown? – StevieG Jan 3 '12 at 20:31
    
Nope. The other two answers (as of this moment) miss the mark (in fact the one which included code would not compile without error). THE PROBLEM IS the "using" statement is mis-formed! No C/C++ compilers (that I know of) care whether something is in a header or the cpp file, it just needs to be able to see and parse it according to the language rules. I do agree, however, that it is generally best practice to declare things in headers - keeps things well organized, and thus maintainable. – Michael E. Morris Jan 3 '12 at 20:43

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.