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I'm not the greatest with AJAX and Javascript / JQuery at this point. I have a situation where I know what the problem is but don't know how to fix it. I have a JQuery autocomplete which was working fine. It was in a placeholder that only showed as visible on the page when a linkButton was clicked. Simple enough. I found that my page worked a lot nicer though if I put the hiding / showing of the placeholders in an Asp.Net AJAX UpdatePanel (so the page wouldn't post back). Simple enough...

But now, when I call the JQuery automplete, it doesn't work. And I know why... it is because the textbox where the autocomplete is wasn't visible when the page loaded and the AJAX click of the linkbutton only refreshed that element and didn't post the whole page back. So, when I go to pageSource, I see the textBox isn't even there. So, of course the autocomplete can't work because it can't find the ID of the element now.

Is there anything I can add to this JQuery code to get it to now see the visible text box that the AJAX panel has shown? Thanks in advance for any help anyone can provide.

<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function() {
$("#<%=txtCityStateZip.ClientID%>").autocomplete('SearchHandlerGRP_BY.ashx');
});      
</script>
<script type="text/javascript">
$(document).ready(function() {
    $("#<%=txtCityStateZip.ClientID%>").show('ErrorHandler.ashx');
});      
</script>
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1  
Do you have access to the success callback of the AJAX call? If so you just add the autocomplete call into the callback. (I haven't used the ASP.NET AJAX and don't know how much it hides from the user.) –  Mathletics Jan 3 '12 at 20:54
1  
Have you checked the error console in FF, Safari or Chrome? Are the '*.ashx' arguments file names? Tell me if I'm wrong, but according the jquery documentation autocomplete() and show() don't support that. –  reporter Jan 3 '12 at 21:02
    
I wasn't really aware that there is such information. Is that in the code-behind file? How would I get aspx page script information into that? –  Paul van Valkenburgh Jan 3 '12 at 21:09
    
Hi reporter... I'm not sure to the answer of your question either... I know it was working though! ha! And then since the original pageLoad didn't have the textBox as it was hidden, after the AJAX call, it still doesn't show so (I'm assuming this is why) it isn't working because it can't find it. –  Paul van Valkenburgh Jan 3 '12 at 21:19
    
I tried using this too but couldn't get it to work : $(function() { initializer(); }); var prmInstance = Sys.WebForms.PageRequestManager.getInstance(); prmInstance.add_endRequest(function() { //you need to re-bind your jquery events here initializer(); }); function initializer() { $("#<%=txtCityStateZip.ClientID%>").autocomplete('SearchHandlerGRP_BY.ashx'); } –  Paul van Valkenburgh Jan 3 '12 at 21:27

1 Answer 1

In order to view the results of AJAX call, pick up on javaScript errors, or to view the state of HTML after it has been manipulated by jQuery, I prefer to use FireFox and the Firebug add-on for the browser. For you to do this, simply make sure FF is updated and then go to Add-ons and Search for Firebug. There will be a number of Add-ons with fire something, but you will want simply "Firebug." The version I am currently using with my version 8.0 of Firefox is 1.8.3.

Once you have this installed, you can toggle the Firebug window by pressing F12 key. My Firebug window is docked at the bottom of the browser, and it is size-able within the browser window.

The two key features that will tell you more about what is going on are both available from the main tool/menu bar of the Firebug pane. You will be interested in the 'element inspection' feature which will allow you to view the html of any element on the page (even after it has been manipulated by scripting). Click the second button from the left on the Firebug bar (the one that is a blue arrow over a blue box) and simply mouse over your page. The html related to the element currently being hovered over will appear in the firebug window. Click an element to "lock" onto that section of html. If you would like to then inspect something different, then click the inspect tool button again.

The other tool you will be able to use that has been referenced above in the comments is the console window. This can be accessed by clicking the "Console tab to the right of the inspection tool button. After it becomes the active tab, be sure click the options arrow and verify that the console is enabled. Once enabled, you can reload your page, and the ajax requests and responses will appear in the console window as they occur.

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