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I want to look for files containing certain words in about 7000 files. I was planning to use Notepad++ but it seems like it has a very hard time with regular expressions. I was trying to use

(Word1|Word2) 
Word1|Word2
[Word1|Word2]

and so forth. Nothing was found.

Visual Studio finds all instances just fine.

Why isn't Notepad++ working? Does it use a different regular expression standard? I know that the syntax can differ by implementation. I usually run into an issue with Notepad++ when trying to use grouping.

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Did you set it to use reg ex down at the bottom of the find window? –  Spencer Rathbun Jan 3 '12 at 21:11
    
I respect that you had to ask the simple question, but I did in fact. I've been using regex in notepad++ for quite some time. As stated in my question I usually have problems with grouping using ( ) All other expressions work. –  ILovePaperTowels Jan 3 '12 at 21:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just checking my assumptions ;). According to the docs, notepad++ uses POSIX regex. See here for a comparison between the basic version and the extended version. I've been bitten before by POSIX compliant programs(I'm looking at you, sed) that don't have the features I needed.

In some cases, there is an alternative under BRE, or else the tool allows you to switch on alternative modes(sed allows for extended, and perl). Note on the flavor reference that BRE does not support | alternation. This is probably why notepad++ has the problem you ran into.

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Notepad++ does not support the alternation | operator:

http://sourceforge.net/apps/mediawiki/notepad-plus/index.php?title=Unsupported_Regex_Operators

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Update to version 6. It is working well now!

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