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I wrote the following code:

class Actions
  def initialize
    @people = []
    @commands = {
      "ADD" => ->(name){@people << name },
      "REMOVE" => ->(n=0){ puts "Goodbye" },
      "OTHER" => ->(n=0){puts "Do Nothing" }
    }
  end
  def run_command(cmd,*param)
    @commands[cmd].call param if @commands.key?(cmd)
  end
  def people
    @people
  end
end
act = Actions.new

act.run_command('ADD','joe')
act.run_command('ADD','jack')
puts act.people

This works, however, when the @commands hash is a class variable, the code inside the hash doesn't know the @people array.

How can I make the @commands hash be a class variable and still be able to access the specific object instance variables?

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1  
Just curious why not to define methods add, remove and other as instance methods and use respond_to? and send to call them? –  Victor Moroz Jan 3 '12 at 21:42
    
Why do you want @commands to be a class variable? –  Andrew Grimm Jan 3 '12 at 22:00
    
@Victor: One good reason is that it makes access control easier. If you use send and methods you'd need a separate list of which methods run_command is allowed to use, using a Hash collects the available commands and their implementations into one nice neat package. –  mu is too short Jan 3 '12 at 22:09
    
@mu can't you just ask respond_to?(cmd)?, that is, why a separate list of allowed commands? –  maprihoda Jan 3 '12 at 22:20
    
@mu send(cmd) if @allowed_methods.include?(cmd), it's still cleaner than using hash of lambdas if you need to access instance variables. –  Victor Moroz Jan 3 '12 at 22:29
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You could use instance_exec to supply the appropriate context for the lambdas when you call them, look for the comments to see the changes:

class Actions
  # Move the lambdas to a class variable, a COMMANDS constant
  # would work just as well and might be more appropriate.
  @@commands = {
    "ADD"    => ->(name)  { @people << name   },
    "REMOVE" => ->(n = 0) { puts "Goodbye"    },
    "OTHER"  => ->(n = 0) { puts "Do Nothing" }
  }
  def initialize
    @people = [ ]
  end
  def run_command(cmd, *param)
    # Use instance_exec and blockify the lambdas with '&'
    # to call them in the context of 'self'. Change the
    # @@commands to COMMANDS if you prefer to use a constant
    # for this stuff.
    instance_exec(param, &@@commands[cmd]) if @@commands.key?(cmd)
  end
  def people
    @people
  end
end
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Aha! 'Arguments are passed as block parameters' to instance_exec –  maprihoda Jan 3 '12 at 22:22
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EDIT Following @VictorMoroz's and @mu's recommendations:

class Actions
  def initialize
    @people = []
  end

  def cmd_add(name)
    @people << name
  end

  def cmd_remove
    puts "Goodbye"
  end

  def cmd_other
    puts "Do Nothing"
  end

  def people
    p @people
  end

  def run_command(cmd, *param)
    cmd = 'cmd_' + cmd.to_s.downcase
    send(cmd, *param) if respond_to?(cmd)
  end
end

act = Actions.new

act.run_command('add', 'joe')
act.run_command(:ADD, 'jill')
act.run_command('ADD', 'jack')

act.run_command('people') # does nothing

act.people

Or

class Actions
  ALLOWED_METHODS = %w( add remove other )

  def initialize
    @people = []
  end

  def add(name)
    @people << name
  end

  def remove
    puts "Goodbye"
  end

  def other
    puts "Do Nothing"
  end

  def people
    p @people
  end

  def run_command(cmd, *param)
    cmd = cmd.to_s.downcase
    send(cmd, *param) if ALLOWED_METHODS.include?(cmd)
  end
end

act = Actions.new

act.run_command('add', 'joe')
act.run_command(:add, 'jill')
act.run_command('add', 'jack')

act.run_command('people') # does nothing

act.people
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