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I currently have 3 classes, a main class containing a GUI, in which i'm calling this method, a customer class containing the data, and a customerList class which gathers the data from the customer class, puts it into an array list, and also contains the search arraylist method.

I'm trying to implement a search method which can be called from my main class on an action event handler. I'm having a few problems though.

Whenever I run the method, the " System.out.println(customer.returnFamilyName());" line always displays the first familyname in my arraylist.

Don't hesitate to ask for more information, I'm not sure how well i've explained this.

Here is my method:

public void searchCustomer(String familyName) {
    int index = 0;
    boolean found = false;
    customer customer;
    while(index < CustomerList.size() && !found) {
        customer = CustomerList.get(index);
        if(customer.returnFamilyName().equalsIgnoreCase(familyName)) {
            found = true;
            break;
        }
        if(found == true) {
            ;
        }
        System.out.println(customer.returnFamilyName());
        index++;
        return;
    }
}
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5 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You never increment index.

The code should be:

public void searchCustomer(String familyName) {
    for (customer customer : CustomerList) {
        if (customer.returnFamilyName().equalsIgnoreCase(familyName)) {
            System.out.println(customer.returnFamilyName());
            break;
        }
    } 
}

Also, the 'customer' class should be called 'Customer' as class names should start with a capital, 'returnFamilyName' should be 'getFamilyName' as accessor methods by convention are named 'get' + the field name and 'CustomerList' should be 'customerList' as field names are supposed to start with a lowercase letter.

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Thank you, with regards to renaming my classes and methods I read about that somewhere earlier, and I'll surely be doing it once I finish writing my class. –  user1080390 Jan 3 '12 at 21:34
    
Why do you bother with the boolean at this point? If you've found what you're looking for, you explicitly print it out to the terminal, then break from the enhanced for-loop, and subsequently the entire method. –  Makoto Jan 3 '12 at 21:39
    
@Makoto, thanks. I fixed my code. That mistake got lost in all the other problems with the original code. –  Skip Head Jan 3 '12 at 21:55
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It's not clear from your question what the intended behaivor actually is. Besides that, what is this ?

if (found == true);

Presumably you meant :

if (found) { 
    System.out.println...
}

But what if the same last name occurs twice in your list? Also why aren't using a Map instead of a List? Lookup will go from being O(n) to O(1)

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Drop the ; in if (found == true); because that reads as: if this condition is true, do notihng and use braces always:

if (found == true) {
   System.out.println(customer.returnFamilyName());
}

Also, include the increment inside the while loop, otherwise you are not really iterating anything.

This code seems to work because your first element happens to coincide with the searched element, try with a different one and you'll end up in a infinite loop.

Try with a version like this:

public void searchCustomer( String familyName ) {

    for ( customer current : CustomerList ) {           
        if ( current.returnFamilyName().equalsIgnoreCase( familyName )) {
            System.out.println( current.returnFamilyName() );
            break;
        }
     }
}

Some additional remarks:

In Java clases should start with uppercase, so the class name should be declared as Customer instead of customer and variables start with lowercase, hence CustomerList should be customerList. Methods may avoid the return part and be named with a get

Also, search methods should better return the found value instead of printing it, so your final version could look like this:

public Customer searchCustomer( String familyName ) {
    for ( Customer current : customerList ) {
       if ( current.getFamilyName().equalsIgnoreCase( familyName ) )  {
          return current;
       }
     }
     return null;
 }
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I would suggest try this:

System.out.println(customer.returnFamilyName());
                index++;
if(found == true) { return;}
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Don't forget to increment the while loop or it has the potential to run indefinitely.

You can elect to use what is known as an "enhanced for-loop", which allows you to eschew the need to increment values over CustomerList entirely. You have an object customer, so we can use that as follows:

for (customer cus: CustomerList) {
     if(cus.returnFamilyName().equalsIgnoreCase(familyName)) {
        System.out.println(cus.returnFamilyName());
        return;
     }
}

If you elect to stick with your original code (which is fine), then observe the changes in your code below.

while(index < CustomerList.size()) {
    customer = CustomerList.get(index);
    if (customer.returnFamilyName().equalsIgnoreCase(familyName)) { 
        System.out.println(customer.returnFamilyName());
        break;
    } else {  
        index++;
    }
}
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You forgot to declare index and your break does nothing because the loop condition includes !found. –  Skip Head Jan 3 '12 at 21:57
    
index was previously declared in earlier code. The break is redundant, but that was in earlier code. –  Makoto Jan 3 '12 at 22:13
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