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I have a program that generates some standard SQL like SELECT * FROM TEST ORDER BY X and passes it (as a string) to a function along with an integer to create a limited query (also a string). For Oracle (which the application was developed against), this function returns SELECT * FROM (sq) WHERE ROWNUM <=n giving:

SELECT * FROM (SELECT * FROM TEST ORDER BY X) WHERE ROWNUM <= 10

which works.

Unfortunately, I can't figure out how to write the equivalent function for Microsoft SQL Server (I'm no MS SQL expert).

I tried:

SELECT TOP 10 FROM (SELECT * FROM TEST ORDER BY X)

but that leads to:

Error: Incorrect syntax near the keyword 'from'.

Then I tried:

SELECT TOP 10 * FROM (SELECT * FROM TEST ORDER BY X)

which gained me:

Error: The ORDER BY clause is invalid in views, inline functions, derived tables, subqueries, and common table expressions, unless TOP or FOR XML is also specified.

which was frustrating since I am specifying TOP....

I tried a few other shotgun variations including:

SELECT TOP (10) * FROM (SELECT * FROM TEST ORDER BY X)
SELECT TOP 10 * FROM (SELECT * FROM TEST ORDER BY X) SUBQUERY
SELECT TOP 10 * FROM (SELECT * FROM TEST ORDER BY X) AS SUBQUERY
SELECT * FROM (SELECT * FROM TEST ORDER BY X) WHERE ROW_NUMBER <= 10

but of course, none of them work either.

Is there no hope at all?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted
+50

Use SET ROWCOUNT. This makes the job really simple.

SET ROWCOUNT 10

SELECT * FROM [TEST] ORDER BY [X]

SET ROWCOUNT 0
share|improve this answer
    
I tend to agree with this one. It's very easy to prefix / suffix ANY string with the ROWCOUNT limitation/reset and it works for pretty much anything you put it around. That said, if the queries are going to be multi-statement you might have strange effects as ALL statements will get limited to n rows. –  deroby Jan 10 '12 at 12:29
    
This is looking pretty good and seemed to work in the situation that led to the question. But I have a funny feeling that there's some downside or gotcha that could catch me by surprise later. –  Samuel Edwin Ward Jan 10 '12 at 14:27
    
This seems to be the cleanest/simplest solution, it works for me, and nobody has mentioned any downsides. Thanks! –  Samuel Edwin Ward Jan 12 '12 at 21:13

Can your function simply replace SELECT with SELECT TOP 10?

SELECT TOP 10 * FROM TEST ORDER BY X
share|improve this answer
    
I think the issue is he knows the count AFTER he knows the subquery. –  JNK Jan 4 '12 at 1:18
    
That would work in this case, but I'd like to be able to pass any query (as a string; updating my question to note this) to the function and get a query that yields the expected result. Simply replacing the first SELECT doesn't yield the expected results for e.g. select x from test1 union select x from test2 (you get all the rows). –  Samuel Edwin Ward Jan 4 '12 at 14:36
    
It helps me to remember that the thing returned by a subquery is always a set (even if you SELECT TOP.. in the subquery) and sets have no order. If you have to use a subquery then JNK's approach is better. –  Andrew Jan 4 '12 at 17:55

You can make proper use of CTE (Common Table Expressions) and Ranking Functions here.

; WITH CTE_RowNumbers AS 
(
    SELECT *, RANK() OVER (ORDER BY X) AS ROWNUM FROM Users
)
SELECT * FROM CTE_RowNumbers WHERE ROWNUM < 10;

Simply replace the 10 with your variable.

This will provide exactly the same results in MS SQL as you would get from a ROWNUM function in Oracle.

Please note: The ROWNUM in this code snippet is just an alias, not a function in MSSQL and the real power sits in the use of the common table expressions and ranking functions used.

UPDATE: Masked CTE - replace the [VAR-Name] with your variables

 ; WITH CTE_RowNumbers AS 
    (
        SELECT [VAR-ColumnList], RANK() OVER (ORDER BY [VAR-OrderByList]) AS ROWNUM FROM [VAR-Table]
    )
    SELECT [VAR-ColumnList] FROM CTE_RowNumbers WHERE ROWNUM < [VAR-ResultSize];

Extract the input variables from your query as such:

SELECT [VAR-ColumnList] FROM [VAR-Table] ORDER BY [VAR-OrderByList]

You will also need to assign a value for [VAR-ResultSize], which by the looks of it is constant and get's set in your function?

Note: More flexibility is possible, if you need to add DESC or ASC to the order by, just extend your script and include that as a variable.

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Do you have any suggestions on how to programmatically convert the input query into this form? –  Samuel Edwin Ward Jan 11 '12 at 14:06
    
@SamuelEdwinWard I can try and point you in a direction... Look at your input query and the query I provided. Provided your input query always has the same basic structure (needs the ORDER BY) you can extract a number of variables (about 3). These will be the column list (* in this case), the table name, and the order by column list (X). Now you can create the basic structure of the CTE as a string and replace markers with the variables. I will update the answer and provide a mask for the CTE in a minute or so... –  SQL Heroes Jan 12 '12 at 6:49
    
I want the function to assume as little about the structure of the input query as possible, so as to be as reusable as possible. –  Samuel Edwin Ward Jan 12 '12 at 17:28

The easiest and most logical solution would be to put your ORDER BY outside the subselect:

SELECT TOP 10 * FROM (SELECT * FROM TEST) as sub ORDER BY X

SQL Server expects the TOP and ORDER to be in the same scope.

Even if you ORDER BY on the inner query, if you did a TOP on the outside it wouldn't be guaranteed to be in the right order.

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You need an alias on the derived table. –  Mikael Eriksson Jan 3 '12 at 22:04
    
@MikaelEriksson - good point –  JNK Jan 4 '12 at 1:13

Subqueries are sets, and are therefore unordered, so you can't use them with ORDER BY unless you also use TOP.

If you want to limit the number of rows returned, and don't care which rows they are, you can just edit out any inner ORDER BY, if there was one, and then provide an alias for the subquery.

Original query:

SELECT * FROM TEST ORDER BY X

Edited and wrapped to return 10 rows:

SELECT TOP 10 * FROM (SELECT * FROM TEST) AS EXPR

Or you can apply a TOP clause to the subquery:

SELECT TOP 10 * FROM (SELECT TOP 10 * FROM TEST ORDER BY X) AS EXPR

Unfortunately, this is not guaranteed to return the same results as:

SELECT TOP 10 * FROM TEST ORDER BY X

For that, you would need to move the ORDER BY outside of the subquery:

SELECT TOP 10 * FROM (SELECT * FROM TEST) AS EXPR ORDER BY X

You can also parameterize the number of rows to return:

SELECT TOP (@nrows) * FROM (SELECT * FROM TEST) AS EXPR

With SQL Server 2012, you can almost achieve what you're really after, except in this case ORDER BY is required:

SELECT * FROM TEST ORDER BY X OFFSET 0 ROWS FETCH NEXT 10 ROWS ONLY
share|improve this answer
    
I wish I had SQL Server 2012. This is still a good answer though, since I didn't specify. –  Samuel Edwin Ward Jan 12 '12 at 21:14

You could try a temporary table:

select * into #temp from test order by x
select top 10 * from #temp where ...
share|improve this answer
    
Is that guaranteed to preserve the order? –  Samuel Edwin Ward Jan 11 '12 at 16:13
    
Even though I've never seen it not preserve the order, I must honestly say that I don't really know whether there's a definition for how results are ordered selecting from a table without an index. –  Thorsten Dittmar Jan 12 '12 at 7:39
    
By the way: The same would be true if SELECT * FROM (SELECT ... ORDER BY ...) worked, as you'd not be specifying an explicit order in your surrounding select. –  Thorsten Dittmar Jan 12 '12 at 7:44
    
That the order of the subquery wouldn't be passed on to the outer query is a very good point that a few people have made regarding this question. In the Oracle case, I suppose it is because ROWNUM is some sort of implicit column. –  Samuel Edwin Ward Jan 12 '12 at 17:31

I think that this is what you're looking for (I'm assuming SQL Server 2005 and above):

SELECT * FROM 
  (SELECT *,ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY x) rownum FROM test) tmp 
WHERE rownum BETWEEN 1 AND 10

Where 'x' is the column to order by and 'test' the table to select from. Also, a 'count' column is often also useful to return, especially if you do paging:

SELECT * FROM 
  (SELECT *,COUNT(*) OVER() cnt,ROW_NUMBER() OVER (ORDER BY x) rownum FROM test) tmp 
WHERE rownum BETWEEN 1 AND 10
share|improve this answer
    
Is this equivalent to Charl Lamprecht's answer? –  Samuel Edwin Ward Jan 12 '12 at 17:33
    
Oh, I didn't see his answer :( Its about the same, but mines single statement. Charl seems very engaged though and I'd credit him, great answer! –  Fredrik Johansson Jan 12 '12 at 21:37
    
Yours does look a bit nicer. –  Samuel Edwin Ward Jan 13 '12 at 13:57

Do one thing which is quite simple and straight forward:-->>

  1. Remove the order by clause and
  2. use the keyword 'AS' after the inner query.

Eg: SELECT TOP 10 * FROM (SELECT * FROM TEST) AS X

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1  
I guess he also cares about the wanted result, not just have something that compiles –  deroby Jan 10 '12 at 12:26
    
Removing the 'order by' clause would remove the ordering, which I want to preserve. And aside from that, I don't believe removing an ORDER BY clause from a SQL string (and getting the correct result) without parsing the SQL is trivial (although I'd be pleased to be shown wrong on this). –  Samuel Edwin Ward Jan 10 '12 at 14:31

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