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I'm writing a scientific web app in Django dealing with the amino acid sequences of antibodies Fab fragments, each of which is comprised of exactly one Heavy Chain and one Light Chain. Each of these chains consists of a sequence of amino acid Residues.

  • Fab 1
    • Light Chain
      • Residue 1
      • Residue 2
      • ...
    • Heavy Chain
      • Residue 1
      • Residue 2
      • ...
  • Fab 2
    • etc...

My models.py is essentially this:

from django.db.models import *

class Fab(Model):
    name = CharField(max_length=30)
    ...
    def __unicode__(self):
        return self.name

class Chain(Model):
    fab = ForeignKey(Fab)
    TYPE_CHOICES = (
        ('L', 'light'),
        ('H', 'heavy'),
    )
    type = CharField(max_length=5)
    ...

class Residue(Model):
    ch = ForeignKey(Chain)
    ...

So in the process of entering an Fab into the database, I create 2 chains, assign each a type and an fab foreign key. Then, to use these in a template, I use the following view, getting each chain as an object and passing it to the template independent of its Fab parent object, which isn't exactly ideal.

def fab_detail(request, fab_id):

    f = get_object_or_404(Fab, pk=fab_id)
    h = get_object_or_404(Chain, fab=f, type='H')
    l = get_object_or_404(Chain, fab=f, type='L')

    return render_to_response('antibodies/fab_detail.html', {
        'fab': f,
        'light': l,
        'heavy': h,
    }, context_instance=RequestContext(request))

However, I want to:

  1. have a better way to refer to the Light or Heavy Chain in a template, e.g. to loop over the residues of the chain with {% for r in fab.light_chain.residue_set.all %}.
  2. ensure that each Fab has only 1 light chain and 1 heavy chain

I've considered subclassing Chain but wasn't sure exactly how to achieve a similar result. I came up with something along the lines of:

class Chain(Model):
    # same as before, but without the fab ForeignKey field
    ...

class LightChain(Chain):
    pass

class HeavyChain(Chain):
    pass

class Fab(Model):
    name = CharField(max_length=30)
    light_chain = OneToOneField(LightChain)
    heavy_chain = OneToOneField(HeavyChain)
    ...

class Residue(Model):
    ???

The main problem I'm having is how to get the LightChain and HeavyChain fields to contain Residue data. Specifically, with what do I replace ch = ForeignKey(Chain) in the Residue class?

Any suggestions or references will be greatly appreciated.

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

keni's solution is the one I was about to write.

However, I don't think that the "choices=TYPE_CHOICES" constraint is enforced at any level, it just tells Django to use a "select" menu in forms and admin. So theoretically you could have type = 'R', 'W' or anything. Btw, I think you (jared) meant max_length=1.

Another solution would be to simply use a multi-table inheritance, as you seem to do, and not an abstract base class, which are two different forms of model inheritance. In which case you can simply have ch = ForeignKey(Chain). But that may be too much overhead: three tables would be created, one for Chain, one for Light and one for Heavy, the latter two ones referencing the first, one and containing basically nothing else. It may be interesting if you need to store specific information for Light or Heavy chains.

A third solution would be to do this:

class Fab(Model):
name = CharField(max_length=30)
light = OneToOneField(Chain, related_name="fab_as_light")
heavy = OneToOneField(Chain, related_name="fab_as_heavy")

This way you can do fab.light and fab.heavy very easily, and uniqueness is enforced. I'm pretty sure it's legal to have two OneToOneField towards the same model. If it's not you can still have a Foreign Key and set it "unique". I think the third one is your solution.

For completeness, you'd have:

class Residue(Model):
ch = ForeignKey(Chain)

And Chain would be almost empty (just the id).

share|improve this answer
    
another thing you might want to do is to not have "ch = ForeignKey(Chain)" in the Residue class but rather a ManyToManyField to Chain. (I'm not at all answering your question here but rather sharing an idea). I might have a completely wrong understanding of what's a "Residue", but if it's a piece of molecule that can be found in different places (for instance in different Fabs), that could make sense. (amongst other things it would allow you to answer to the question, "in which Fabs does that Residue appear?", if that makes any sense) – Arthur Jan 4 '12 at 0:42
    
Thanks for this @Arthur. After trying it briefly, it looks like your third solution will be a good option for what I need to do once I get everything working. However, I'm having trouble accessing the 'fab' reverse relationship from the Chain object. e.g. f = Fab(...); l = Chain(); f.light = l; print l.fab_as_light raises a DoesNotExist: Fab matching query does not exist exception. Is there something I'm missing in this workflow? – jared Jan 4 '12 at 17:04
    
Also, since you brought it up, in biology, an amino acid residue is just a building block that makes up part of a protein. If the protein were represented by a train, then each residue would be one of the train cars. What makes one protein different from another is the sequence of these residues. You may be correct in saying I should have a ManyToManyField here, but I would probably call it ResidueTypes. Here, I use Residue to mean "an instance of a ResidueType at a given position in the protein chain." – jared Jan 4 '12 at 17:27
    
@jared have you done f.save() before trying l.fab_as_light? You'll have to do l.save() too, actually. – Arthur Jan 5 '12 at 2:25
    
ok, it's just that I can't seem to find a translation for "residue" in French. I think we just talk about amino acids. About the M2M field, do of course as you feel. If you go down the M2M route, you could add a through argument in the M2MField referring to your own M2M table, in which you could add for instance the position of the residue in the chain. This way you could separate information on Residue types from information on "a residue in a chain". But again, do as you like! – Arthur Jan 5 '12 at 2:34

For one, you can have a meta class to make the fields unique on a combination of type and chain type.

class Chain(Model):
    fab = ForeignKey(Fab)
    TYPE_CHOICES = (
        ('L', 'light'),
        ('H', 'heavy'),
    )
    type = CharField(max_length=5, choices=TYPE_CHOICES)

    class Meta:
        unique_together = (
            ('type', 'fab'),
        )

This way, you can't add more that 2 since you have only two choices anyway.

class Residue(Model):
    ch = ForeignKey(Chain)

looks good as used above already.

share|improve this answer

After trying a couple different things and not being able to use the 'my_chain.fab_as_light/heavy' syntax, my current solution is to use a variation on @Arthur's solution, where I generate a couple properties called 'type' and 'fab' in the Chain model, which are calculated based on the related_name value of the Fab object. (These will be useful, for example, in a function that performs operations on a Chain object but doesn't care which type of chain it is: my_chain.fab returns the Fab object for either a light or heavy chain.)

class Chain(Model):

    # determine the type based on Fab related_name
    def _get_type(self):
        try:
            if self.fab_as_light:
                return 'L'
        except:
            try:
                if self.fab_as_heavy:
                    return 'H'
            except:
                return None
    type = property(_get_type)

    # consolidate fab_as_light and fab_as_heavy into one property
    def _get_fab(self):
        try:
            return self.fab_as_light
        except:
            try:
                return self.fab_as_heavy
            except:
                return None
    fab = property(_get_fab)

    def __unicode__(self):
        return "%s_%s" % (self.fab.name, self.type)

class Fab(Model):
    name = CharField(max_length=30)
    light = OneToOneField(Chain, related_name='fab_as_light')
    heavy = OneToOneField(Chain, related_name='fab_as_heavy')

This probably isn't the best route (it's not exactly graceful!), but it's working for me so I'll go with it for now.

Thanks all for your input.

share|improve this answer
    
it's true that the first property is not very elegant. Maybe you could store the type in the Chain model (which you'd use also in the second property) – Arthur Jan 5 '12 at 2:41

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