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Here's a constructor for my Game class:

// Construct a Game to be played with player on a copy of the board b.
Game(const Board& b, Player* player)
{
  ...
}

Here's how I'm using the constructor:

Player p("Player Name");
Board b(6,3);
Game g(b, &p);

How does this work? Is b being copied?

If I want to save a pointer to player, should I create a private ivar like the following?

private:
  Player* _player;

...
// In Game constructor
_player = player;
share|improve this question
    
As a side note: don't prefix your variables with '' in C++, since the '' prefix is reserved for the compiler vendor in C & C++. –  Johann Gerell May 18 '09 at 9:23
1  
What name should I use, then? –  Elliot May 24 '09 at 6:23
    
I do want to comment that this could be dangerous (which is why vector actually makes a copy of the object vs taking in a reference when you call push_back) - example gist.github.com/nadams810/6756139. That code works just fine on VC++/gcc...but that's just by random luck as the destructor was called for CC so x should no longer be usable. I'm not saying you should or shouldn't use it - just be mindful of the scope of what you are passing around. –  Nathan Adams Sep 29 '13 at 20:19

3 Answers 3

If you pass by reference or pointer then no copy is made. If you want to save a pointer, then yes, you need somewhere to save it.

Note that it is generally better practice to use constructor initialisation lists rather than assignment. prefer:

Game( const Board& b, Player * player ) : _player( player )
{
    // do something with Board
}

to:

Game( const Board& b, Player * player )
{
    _player = player;
    // do something with Board
}

For pointers, there is no great difference, but for more complex objects, using initialisation avoids possible semantic and performance problems with assignment.

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When assigning to constant members the initialization list is the only way. –  Dario May 16 '09 at 17:58

As it was mentioned parameter won't be copied as it passed by reference.
But I'd like to point to some style issues.

Don't mix your style. Is it possible to play game without a player? If it is not, pass the player by the reference.

Another mix. One parameter you pass as the whole word and other as one letter.

Game(const Board& board, Player& player):
    _player(player)    
{
  ...
}

private:
  Player& _player;

And possibly you will want to store the Board too as it makes sense. Game can "know" about the board.

private:
    const Board& _board;

Then your constructor will be

Game(const Board& board, Player& player):
    _board(board),
    _player(player)
{
  ...
}
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+1 for pointing out that no pointer is needed to avoid copying -- references can be used too. –  anon May 16 '09 at 9:05

You are passing the board by reference, so no, it is not being copied.

If you have some code later like:

Board _privateBoard = b;

Then you are copying b. But it isn't getting copied into the function.

As for your question, yes you'll need to store the pointer somewhere if you want to get it back.

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"Then you are copying b" if _privateBoard is a "Board" and not a "Board&", no? –  David Schmitt May 16 '09 at 9:14
    
Yup. I edited to clarify. –  GManNickG May 16 '09 at 9:46

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