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I am trying to calculate exponential moving average on 15 day bars, but want to see "evolution" of the 15 day bar EMA on each (end of) day/bar. So, this means that I have 15 day bars. When new data comes in on a daily basis I would like to recalculate EMA using new information. Actually I have 15 day bars and then, after each day my new 15 day bar starts to grow and each new bar that comes along is supposed to be used for EMA calculation together with previous full 15 day bars.

Lets say we start at 2012-01-01 (we have data for each calender day for this example), at the end of 2012-01-15 we have the first complete 15 day bar. After 4 completed full 15 day bars on 2012-03-01 we can start calculating 4 bar EMA (EMA(x, n=4)). On the end of 2012-03-02 we use information we have until this moment and calculate EMA on 2012-03-02 pretending that OHLC for 2012-03-02 is the 15 day bar in progress. So we take the 4 complete bars and the bar on 2012-03-02 and calculate EMA(x, n=4). We then wait another day, see what happened with the new 15 day bar in progress (see function to.period.cumulative below for details) and calculate new value for EMA... And so for the next 15 days onwards... See function EMA.cumulative below for details...

Below please find what I was able to come up with until now. The performance is not acceptable for me and I can not make it any faster with my limited R knowledge.

library(quantmod)

do.call.rbind <- function(lst) {
    while(length(lst) > 1) {
        idxlst <- seq(from=1, to=length(lst), by=2)

        lst <- lapply(idxlst, function(i) {
                    if(i==length(lst)) { return(lst[[i]]) }

                    return(rbind(lst[[i]], lst[[i+1]]))
                })
    }
    lst[[1]]
}

to.period.cumulative <- function(x, name=NULL, period="days", numPeriods=15) {
    if(is.null(name))
        name <- deparse(substitute(x))

    cnames <- c("Open", "High", "Low", "Close")
    if (has.Vo(x)) 
        cnames <- c(cnames, "Volume")

    cnames <- paste(name, cnames, sep=".") 

    if (quantmod:::is.OHLCV(x)) {
        x <- OHLCV(x)
        out <- do.call.rbind( 
                lapply(split(x, f=period, k=numPeriods), 
                        function(x) cbind(rep(first(x[,1]), NROW(x[,1])), 
                                cummax(x[,2]), cummin(x[,3]), x[,4], cumsum(x[,5]))))
    } else if (quantmod:::is.OHLC(x)) {
        x <- OHLC(x)
        out <- do.call.rbind( 
                lapply(split(x, f=period, k=numPeriods), 
                        function(x) cbind(rep(first(x[,1]), NROW(x[,1])), 
                                cummax(x[,2]), cummin(x[,3]), x[,4])))
    } else {
        stop("Object does not have OHLC(V).")
    }

    colnames(out) <- cnames

    return(out)
}

EMA.cumulative<-function(cumulativeBars, nEMA = 4, period="days", numPeriods=15) {
    barsEndptCl <- Cl(cumulativeBars[endpoints(cumulativeBars, on=period,     k=numPeriods)])

    # TODO: This is sloooooooooooooooooow... 
    outEMA <- do.call.rbind(
            lapply(split(Cl(cumulativeBars), period), 
                    function(x) {
                        previousFullBars <- barsEndptCl[index(barsEndptCl) < last(index(x)), ]
                        if (NROW(previousFullBars) >= (nEMA - 1)) {
                                last(EMA(last(rbind(previousFullBars, x), n=(nEMA + 1)), n=nEMA))
                        } else {
                            xts(NA, order.by=index(x))
                        }
                    }))

    colnames(outEMA) <- paste("EMA", nEMA, sep="")

    return(outEMA)
}

getSymbols("SPY", from="2010-01-01")

SPY.cumulative <- to.period.cumulative(SPY, , name="SPY")

system.time(
        SPY.EMA <- EMA.cumulative(SPY.cumulative)
)

On my system it takes

   user  system elapsed 
  4.708   0.000   4.410 

Acceptable execution time would be less than one second... Is it possible to achieve this using pure R?

This post is linked to Optimize moving averages calculation - is it possible? where I received no answers. I was now able to create a reproducible example with more detailed explanation of what I want to speed up. I hope the question makes more sense now.

Any ideas on how to speed this up are highly appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
Huh, then I have a problem. Lets say we have data on a daily basis. I would like to calculate 4 bar EMA (EMA(x, n=4)) on 15 day basis/bars. So transforming daily data to 15 day bars using to.period. That would be easy. What I want to get is I want to see the development of 4 day EMA on 15 day bars every day. Like you would like to draw (near) real time graph of EMA as new data keeps coming in. You consider the last known data as a full 15 day bar (even if it is only 3 days "old" for example). Then you take what you know now and all the previous full 15 day bars and calculate EMA. Any better? –  Samo Jan 3 '12 at 23:51
    
Joshua, thank you for your kind offer. Just to make you aware of boundary and starting conditions: I am a part time unprofitable retail trader/programmer with a small trading account making this a hobby (or programming exercise) who chose R as a platform for supporting my trading (well, only backtesting actually) activities. I am not developing this for commercial purposes for any legal entity. I am very grateful for all you have created and all the support provided in your free time. If I get no other ideas "for free" then I will for sure accept your kind offer. –  Samo Jan 4 '12 at 0:10
    
Joshua, no revenue on this one, sorry. Thanks for "pushing" me in learning how to use C with R. Thanks for C and Fortran code in TTR. –  Samo Jan 15 '12 at 21:37
    
A little late to this, but can you clarify what you mean by a "bar" or a "15 day bar"? Is this the same as a sliding window, i.e. a 15 day sliding window? –  Iterator Jan 18 '12 at 13:37
    
@Iterator a bar is a notation of the (boundaries of) price movements of financial time series in certain time period. It represents the price at the beginning of the time interval (open price), at the end of interval (closing price) and the maximum (High) and minimum (Low) in the time period. Bar length (time duration) can be anything: 1 minute, 15 minutes, 1 day, 1 week... You can try and use: library(quantmod);getSymbols("SPY");chart_Series(SPY) and you will see what I mean by a bar... A candlestick actually. –  Samo Jan 21 '12 at 12:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I have not find a satisfactory solution for my question using R. So I took the old tool, c language, and results are better than I would have ever expected. Thanks for "pushing" me using this great tools of Rcpp, inline etc. Amazing. I guess, whenever I have performance requirements in the future and can not be met using R I will add C to R and performance is there. So, please see below my code and resolution of the performance issues.

# How to speedup cumulative EMA calculation
# 
###############################################################################

library(quantmod)
library(Rcpp)
library(inline)
library(rbenchmark)

do.call.rbind <- function(lst) {
    while(length(lst) > 1) {
        idxlst <- seq(from=1, to=length(lst), by=2)

        lst <- lapply(idxlst, function(i) {
                    if(i==length(lst)) { return(lst[[i]]) }

                    return(rbind(lst[[i]], lst[[i+1]]))
                })
    }
    lst[[1]]
}

to.period.cumulative <- function(x, name=NULL, period="days", numPeriods=15) {
    if(is.null(name))
        name <- deparse(substitute(x))

    cnames <- c("Open", "High", "Low", "Close")
    if (has.Vo(x)) 
        cnames <- c(cnames, "Volume")

    cnames <- paste(name, cnames, sep=".") 

    if (quantmod:::is.OHLCV(x)) {
        x <- quantmod:::OHLCV(x)
        out <- do.call.rbind( 
                lapply(split(x, f=period, k=numPeriods), 
                        function(x) cbind(rep(first(x[,1]), NROW(x[,1])), 
                                cummax(x[,2]), cummin(x[,3]), x[,4], cumsum(x[,5]))))
    } else if (quantmod:::is.OHLC(x)) {
        x <- OHLC(x)
        out <- do.call.rbind( 
                lapply(split(x, f=period, k=numPeriods), 
                        function(x) cbind(rep(first(x[,1]), NROW(x[,1])), 
                                cummax(x[,2]), cummin(x[,3]), x[,4])))
    } else {
        stop("Object does not have OHLC(V).")
    }

    colnames(out) <- cnames

    return(out)
}

EMA.cumulative<-function(cumulativeBars, nEMA = 4, period="days", numPeriods=15) {
    barsEndptCl <- Cl(cumulativeBars[endpoints(cumulativeBars, on=period, k=numPeriods)])

    # TODO: This is sloooooooooooooooooow... 
    outEMA <- do.call.rbind(
            lapply(split(Cl(cumulativeBars), period), 
                    function(x) {
                        previousFullBars <- barsEndptCl[index(barsEndptCl) < last(index(x)), ]
                        if (NROW(previousFullBars) >= (nEMA - 1)) {
                                last(EMA(last(rbind(previousFullBars, x), n=(nEMA + 1)), n=nEMA))
                        } else {
                            xts(NA, order.by=index(x))
                        }
                    }))

    colnames(outEMA) <- paste("EMA", nEMA, sep="")

    return(outEMA)
}

EMA.c.c.code <- '
    /* Initalize loop and PROTECT counters */
    int i, P=0;

    /* ensure that cumbars and fullbarsrep is double */
    if(TYPEOF(cumbars) != REALSXP) {
      PROTECT(cumbars = coerceVector(cumbars, REALSXP)); P++;
    }

    /* Pointers to function arguments */
    double *d_cumbars = REAL(cumbars);
    int i_nper = asInteger(nperiod);
    int i_n = asInteger(n);
    double d_ratio = asReal(ratio);

    /* Input object length */
    int nr = nrows(cumbars);

    /* Initalize result R object */
    SEXP result;
    PROTECT(result = allocVector(REALSXP,nr)); P++;
    double *d_result = REAL(result);

    /* Find first non-NA input value */
    int beg = i_n*i_nper - 1;
    d_result[beg] = 0;
    for(i = 0; i <= beg; i++) {
        /* Account for leading NAs in input */
        if(ISNA(d_cumbars[i])) {
            d_result[i] = NA_REAL;
            beg++;
            d_result[beg] = 0;
            continue;
        }
        /* Set leading NAs in output */
        if(i < beg) {
            d_result[i] = NA_REAL;
        }
        /* Raw mean to start EMA - but only on full bars*/
        if ((i != 0) && (i%i_nper == (i_nper - 1))) {
            d_result[beg] += d_cumbars[i] / i_n;
        }
    }

    /* Loop over non-NA input values */
    int i_lookback = 0;
    for(i = beg+1; i < nr; i++) {
        i_lookback = i%i_nper;

        if (i_lookback == 0) {
            i_lookback = 1;
        } 
        /*Previous result should be based only on full bars*/
        d_result[i] = d_cumbars[i] * d_ratio + d_result[i-i_lookback] * (1-d_ratio);
    }

    /* UNPROTECT R objects and return result */
    UNPROTECT(P);
    return(result);
'

EMA.c.c <- cfunction(signature(cumbars="numeric", nperiod="numeric", n="numeric",     ratio="numeric"), EMA.c.c.code)

EMA.cumulative.c<-function(cumulativeBars, nEMA = 4, period="days", numPeriods=15) {
    ratio <- 2/(nEMA+1)

    outEMA <- EMA.c.c(cumbars=Cl(cumulativeBars), nperiod=numPeriods, n=nEMA, ratio=ratio)  

    outEMA <- reclass(outEMA, Cl(cumulativeBars))

    colnames(outEMA) <- paste("EMA", nEMA, sep="")

    return(outEMA)
}

getSymbols("SPY", from="2010-01-01")

SPY.cumulative <- to.period.cumulative(SPY, name="SPY")

system.time(
        SPY.EMA <- EMA.cumulative(SPY.cumulative)
)

system.time(
        SPY.EMA.c <- EMA.cumulative.c(SPY.cumulative)
)


res <- benchmark(EMA.cumulative(SPY.cumulative), EMA.cumulative.c(SPY.cumulative),
        columns=c("test", "replications", "elapsed", "relative", "user.self", "sys.self"),
        order="relative",
        replications=10)

print(res)

EDIT: To give an indication of performance improvement over my cumbersome (I am sure it can be made better, since in effect I have created double for loop) R here is a print out:

> print(res)
                              test replications elapsed relative user.self
2 EMA.cumulative.c(SPY.cumulative)           10   0.026    1.000     0.024
1   EMA.cumulative(SPY.cumulative)           10  57.732 2220.462    56.755

So, by my standards, a SF type of improvement...

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for sharing this code and demonstrating the utility of C, etc. Any comments on the timings for your example? I.e. what was the output of the benchmark() call? –  Iterator Jan 18 '12 at 13:41
    
I was thrilled by performance improvement (please see edited post). That was to be expected since in my R code (indicated by comment # TODO: This is sloooooooooooooooooow...) I have effectively created a double for loop using rbind and lapply. But my R skills are to basics to be able to make performance improvement using R so reverted to C... –  Samo Jan 21 '12 at 12:14

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