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What's wrong with this set of code? I have errors and I can't find out what's wrong with it. Below is the logic for what I am trying to do. Can someone help me solve this?

CustNum says that it's hiding an inherited member and it's saying an error for the Convert.ToInt32 line and the new Customer() method does not work.

using System;
public class DebugEight01
{
    public static void main()
    {
        Customer aRegularCustomer = new Customer();
        FrequentCustomer aFrequentCustomer = new Customer(); // I have an error here. 
        aRegularCustomer.CustNum = 2514;
        aRegularCustomer.CustBalance = 765.00;
        aFrequentCustomer.CustNum = 5719;
        aFrequentCustomer.CustBalance = 2500.00;
        aFrequentCustomer.DiscountRate = 0.15;   //15 % 
        Console.WriteLine("\naRegularCustomer #{0} owes {1}",
           aRegularCustomer.CustNum,
           aRegularCustomer.CustBalance = Convert.ToInt32; // I have an error here
        Console.WriteLine("\naFrequentCustomer #{0} would owe {1} without the discount",
           aFrequentCustomer.CustNum,
           aFrequentCustomer.CustBalance.ToString("C2"));
        double newBal = (1 - aFrequentCustomer.DiscountRate) *
           aFrequentCustomer.CustBalance;
        Console.WriteLine("...with {0} discount, customer owes {1}",
           aFrequentCustomer.DiscountRate.ToString("P"), newBal.ToString("C"));
    }
}
public class Customer
{
    private int custNum;
    private double custBalance;
    public int CustNum
    {
        get
        {
            return custNum;
        }
        set
        {
            custNum = value;
        }
    }
    public double CustBalance
    {
        get
        {
            return custBalance;
        }
        set
        {
            CustBalance = value;
        }
    }
}
class FrequentCustomer : Customer
{
    private double discountRate;
    public double DiscountRate
    {
        get
        {
            return discountRate;
        }
        set
        {
            discountRate = value;
        }
    }
    public int CustNum // I have an error here, it's hiding inherited member?
    {
        get
        {
            return base.CustNum;
        }
        set
        {
            CustNum = value;
        }
    }
}
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Regarding deleting your code: Please see the FAQ. –  the Tin Man Jan 6 '12 at 19:07

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When you are working with classes and inheritance, there are some rules that are applied when you instantiate variables.

If your inheritance tree is something like this

class Object + class Customer + class FrequentCustomer

If you declare a variable of type Object on the right side of the declaration it can take any type that is further down the inheritance tree. This means, it your variable is of type FrequentCustomer it has to be assigned an instance of FrequentCustomer only. If it's of type Customer then it can take both Customer and FrequentCustomer and so on. All classes inherit the type object, which is why I added it to the inheritance tree. The following are all valid declarations.

object c = new Customer();
object c = new FrequesntCustomer();
Customer c = new Customer();
Customer c = new FequentCustomer();
FrequentCustomer c = new FrequentCustomer();

This is where why your first compile error occurs.

Second error is because you are using the Convert.ToInt32() method incorrectly. The correct syntax is

Console.WriteLine("\naRegularCustomer #{0} owes {1}",
       aRegularCustomer.CustNum,
       Convert.ToInt32(aRegularCustomer.CustBalance)); // im having a error here

Your third error is not an error, but a warning only. The class FrequentCustomer already has the properties from Customer inherited, even though you haven't specified them explicitly. This means, that you don't need to specify the propert CustNum in the FrequentCustomer class, it already had it inherited. However, if for some reason you need to add the property (because for example it has different implementation that his parent class), then you need to add the keyword new on the property like this:

public new int CustNum
{
    get
    {
        return base.CustNum;
    }
    set
    {
        CustNum = value;
    }
}

If you don't do this, this will be done automatically (hiding inherited member), but you will get a warning about it.

share|improve this answer
    
I edited the answer. Put it at the end. Console.WriteLine("\naRegularCustomer #{0} owes {1}", aRegularCustomer.CustNum, Convert.ToInt32(aRegularCustomer.CustBalance)); –  Tomislav Markovski Jan 4 '12 at 2:30
    
DiscountRate is a property of the class FrequentCustomer therefore your variable must be of type FrequentCustomer delcared on the left side. FrequentCustomer cust = new FrequentCustomer() like this. –  Tomislav Markovski Jan 4 '12 at 2:34
    
There's chat here on StackOverflow. chat.stackoverflow.com/rooms/6367/alexanders-homework –  Tomislav Markovski Jan 4 '12 at 2:44

CustNum in the parent class needs to be marked virtual.

Your second error is a lack of a closing bracket, and the fact that you aren't actually supplying Convert.ToInt32 with a parameter (i.e. something to convert).

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Regarding Hiding Inherited members,
Customer is a base class and it already has a property CustNum so there is no need to specify this on FrequentCustomer unless you want to Override this

   FrequentCustomer aFrequentCustomer = new Customer(); // im having a error here. 

   Customer aFrequentCustomer = new FrequentCustomer();

First statement will not work, it actually goes the other way around. The second statement will work. If you really want to do it this way, you could consider using interface like ICustomer

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First of all it not error (im having a error here, its hiding inherited member?). Its warning. No need to redefine CustNum property in sub-class. That way you are hiding base class memeber.

Error at - FrequentCustomer aFrequentCustomer = new Customer(); and it must be,

FrequentCustomer aFrequentCustomer = new FrequentCustomer ();

Error at - CustBalance property in Customer class

 public double CustBalance
    {
        get
        {
            return custBalance;
        }
        set
        {
            // CustBalance = value; <-- It will assign value to property not a field
            //                          will cause StackOverflow
            custBalance=value;                          
        }
    }

And no need to convert while you are printing/writing them as string.

 Console.WriteLine("\naRegularCustomer #{0} owes {1}",
           aRegularCustomer.CustNum,
           aRegularCustomer.CustBalance);

For better practice always use _ (underscore) as first char of field or use Auto-Implemented properties.

public class Customer
{
    private int _custNum;
    private double _custBalance;
    public int CustNum
    {
        get
        {
            return _custNum;
        }
        set
        {
            _custNum = value;
        }
    }
   .....
}

Auto-Implemented properties:

public class Customer
{
  public int CustNum {get;set;}
  public double CustBalance {get;set;}
}
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What the 'inherited member' message means is that the CustNum property of the Customer class is no longer accessible from the FrequentCutomer class. It doesn't recognize that they are supposed to be the same property. You need to tell it that by marking the one in Customer as virtual as in public virtual int CustNum. You mark the one in FrequentCustomer as override as in public override int CustNum. In this case, the property could be eliminated from the FrequentCustomer class, as it is just redundant.

I think you meant Convert.ToInt32(aRegularCustomer.CustBalance). Though personally, I never use Convert. I would normally use (int)aRegularCustomer.CustBalance, but this is just my preference.

Instead of new Customer() you want new FrequentCustomer(). You can't put a Customer into a FrequentCustomer variable, because it isn't one.

One more thing, you meant custBalance = value; in your CustBalance property. Otherwise, setting the property generates an infinite loop.

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Your error is due to the linbe:

     FrequentCustomer aFrequentCustomer = new Customer(); // im having a error here.  

It is causing an error because you are trying to store a reference to an object in a variable that is declared to be of a type which is dervived from the concrete type of the object (on the right side). This is like creating an object of type Mammal, and attempting to call it a pig. It's ok to create a Pig and call it a Mammal, but it's not ok to create a Mammal and call it a pig.

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