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I have got an array of the following structs

typedef struct _my_data_ 
{
  unsigned int id;
  double latitude;
  double longitude;
  unsigned int content_len;
  char* name_dyn;
  char* descr_dyn;
} mydata;

and would like to sort it ascending by the ID. I read it is possible to sort arrays using the qsort function but I am not sure how to correctly use it when sorting structs.

Any help would be appreciated.

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5  
Have you written a function that can tell you which of two given structs has a larger or smaller id field? –  sarnold Jan 4 '12 at 2:09

1 Answer 1

up vote 12 down vote accepted

You need a structure comparator function that matches the prototype of the function expected by qsort(), viz:

int md_comparator(const void *v1, const void *v2)
{
    const mydata *p1 = (mydata *)v1;
    const mydata *p2 = (mydata *)v2;
    if (p1->id < p2->id)
        return -1;
    else if (p1->id > p2->id)
        return +1;
    else
        return 0;
}

If you ever get to a more complex sort criterion, this is still a good basis because you can add secondary criteria using the same skeleton:

int md_comparator(const void *v1, const void *v2)
{
    const mydata *p1 = (mydata *)v1;
    const mydata *p2 = (mydata *)v2;
    if (p1->latitude < p2->latitude)
        return -1;
    else if (p1->latitude > p2->latitude)
        return +1;
    else if (p1->longitude < p2->longitude)
        return -1;
    else if (p1->longitude > p2->longitude)
        return +1;
    else
        return 0;
}

Clearly, this repeats for as many criteria as you need. If you need to call a function (strcmp()?) to compare values, call it once but assign the return to a local variable and use that twice:

int md_comparator(const void *v1, const void *v2)
{
    const mydata *p1 = (mydata *)v1;
    const mydata *p2 = (mydata *)v2;
    int rc;
    if (p1->latitude < p2->latitude)
        return -1;
    else if (p1->latitude > p2->latitude)
        return +1;
    else if (p1->longitude < p2->longitude)
        return -1;
    else if (p1->longitude > p2->longitude)
        return +1;
    else if ((rc = strcmp(p1->name_dyn, p2->name_dyn)) < 0)
        return -1;
    else if (rc > 0)
        return +1;
    else
        return 0;
}

Also, this template works when data members are unsigned integers, and it avoids overflow problems when comparing signed integers. Note that the short cut you might sometimes see, namely variations on:

int md_comparator(const void *v1, const void *v2)   /* BAD */
{                                                   /* BAD */
    const mydata *p1 = (mydata *)v1;                /* BAD */
    const mydata *p2 = (mydata *)v2;                /* BAD */
    return(p1->id - p2->id);                        /* BAD */
}                                                   /* BAD */

is bad if id is unsigned (the difference of two unsigned integers is never negative), and subject to overflow if the integers are signed and of large magnitude and opposite signs.

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Thank you for your comment and +1 by the way! –  Mai Longdong Jan 4 '12 at 2:21
    
Many thanks for your answer, I'm going to try this code right now. –  beta Jan 4 '12 at 2:37
1  
Meditations on 'if id is unsigned': since the return is int, the unsigned value will be converted to int, so it could become negative. However, if id was unsigned long or unsigned long long, and sizeof(long) > sizeof(int) then you'd be vulnerable to some very odd behaviour. The observation that the explicit return ±1 mechanism always works is still accurate; the sweeping "subtraction doesn't work if the comparison of two unsigned quantities" is not strictly accurate. –  Jonathan Leffler Jan 4 '12 at 2:52
    
Ok I understand. Thanks a lot for the explanation. –  beta Jan 9 '12 at 0:15

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