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I'm trying to center both horizontally and vertically a div inside an outer div. It works when the outer div has specific width and height set in pixels like

#countdownBox {
    width: 700px;
    height: 500px;
    display: table-cell;
    vertical-align: middle;
    text-align: center;
}

but it fails when the height and width are percentages like

#countdownBox {
    width: 100%;
    height: 100%;
    display: table-cell;
    vertical-align: middle;
    text-align: center;
}

Why is this and is there a work around?

EDIT Here is the HTML with container CSS:

#countdownBoxContainer {
width: 100%;
height: 100%;
position: absolute;
bottom: 0;
left: 0;
z-index: 3;
}

<div id="countdownBoxContainer">
    <div id="countdownBox">
      <div>
        hi there
      </div>
    </div>
 </div>
share|improve this question
1  
What does the HTML look like? Percentage widths and heights (usually) won't work unless the containing element has a set dimension. –  HackedByChinese Jan 4 '12 at 2:25
    
added HTML. The container is the same size of its parent. –  yourfriendzak Jan 4 '12 at 2:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Based on the fact that you have width and height of 100% declared I'm going to assume that you're not expecting anyone to have to scroll here. See this Fiddle where I have a working solution based on those parameters.

Remember that display: table-cell; acts exactly like <td> elements and they won't render correctly unless they're in a <table> (or a container that is display: table;).

The other problem is that <html> and <body> aren't necessarily the height of the screen if the content is very small. html, body { height: 100%; } fixes this but it's a bit hacky.

share|improve this answer
    
This works, thank you. However, to keep a position absolute on the elements, I've had to add yet another outer wrapper containing the display: table div. This means I now have 3 layers of divs just to center an element...seems damn clumsy. –  yourfriendzak Jan 4 '12 at 3:06
    
Why do you need the container to be absolutely positioned? –  anstosa Jan 4 '12 at 3:08
    
Because it needs to overlap other divs. –  yourfriendzak Jan 4 '12 at 3:09
    
Well if you're really put off by the extra wrapper you could use negative margins to get the elements to overlap. –  anstosa Jan 4 '12 at 3:12
    
The most elegant solution would be to use flexboxes. Works flawlessy in Chrome and Safari, but for some reason, Firefox is giving me a lot of trouble with those. –  yourfriendzak Jan 4 '12 at 3:32

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