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So I've been reading on concurrency and have some questions on the way (guide I followed - though I'm not sure if its the best source):

  1. Processes vs. Threads: Is the difference basically that a process is the program as a whole while a thread can be a (small) part of a program?
  2. I am not exactly sure why there is a interrupted() method and a InterruptedException. Why should the interrupted() method even be used? It just seems to me that Java just adds an extra layer of indirection.
  3. For synchronization (and specifically about the one in that link), how does adding the synchronize keyword even fix the problem? I mean, if Thread A gives back its incremented c and Thread B gives back the decremented c and store it to some other variable, I am not exactly sure how the problem is solved. I mean this may be answering my own question, but is it supposed to be assumed that after one of the threads return an answer, terminate? And if that is the case, why would adding synchronize make a difference?
  4. I read (from some random PDF) that if you have two Threads start() subsequently, you cannot guarantee that the first thread will occur before the second thread. How would you guarantee it, though?
  5. In synchronization statements, I am not completely sure whats the point of adding synchronized within the method. What is wrong with leaving it out? Is it because one expects both to mutate separately, but to be obtained together? Why not just have the two non-synchronized?
  6. Is volatile just a keyword for variables and is synonymous with synchronized?
  7. In the deadlock problem, how does synchronize even help the situation? What makes this situation different from starting two threads that change a variable?
  8. Moreover, where is the "wait"/lock for the other person to bowBack? I would have thought that bow() was blocked, not bowBack().

I'll stop here because I think if I went any further without these questions answered, I will not be able to understand the later lessons.

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2  
You said this: I'll stop here because I think if I went any further without these questions answered, I will not be able to understand the later lessons. Good point - but you need to carry it further because what you've posted here is too broad. Start at #1 and just #1. Don't move on to #2 until you understand #1. Take the time to make a sample program or two. If you have any questions with that specifically then ask a single question; instead of asking 8 of them at once. –  Dave Jan 4 '12 at 3:33
    
I can answer some of those: 1: yes, exactly. Think of threads as threads and programs as quilts. 2: Because sometimes you want to cut a thread off from some things, like sleeping. interruped() tells you if the thread has been interrupted. 3: Synchronization means only 1 thing can access the block at a time. Everything else has to wait. 4: You would guarantee it by waiting till the first thread has indicated it has started. 5:As I said before, the JVM can only have one thread inside each synchronized block. Use this for things that can't be simulatneously edited. That's all I know :D –  Ryan Amos Jan 4 '12 at 3:33
    
Read Java Concurrency in Practice –  Bohemian Jan 4 '12 at 3:47
    
@Ryan, on your items 3 and 5, you are close but more precisely, only one thread at a time is allowed in the synchronized block per the variable being synchronized (so if you have multiple object instances with a synchronized block for the object, then they can all be access concurrently). –  Francis Upton Jan 4 '12 at 4:03
    
@Francis Ah, yes. That makes sense. I've never actually used synchronized. Thank you for correcting me. –  Ryan Amos Jan 5 '12 at 0:40

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Answers:

  1. Yes, a process is an operating system process that has an address space, a thread is a unit of execution, and there can be multiple units of execution in a process.
  2. The interrupt() method and InterruptedException are generally used to wake up threads that are waiting to either have them do something or terminate.
  3. Synchronizing is a form of mutual exclusion or locking, something very standard and required in computer programming. Google these terms and read up on that and you will have your answer.
  4. True, this cannot be guaranteed, you would have to have some mechanism, involving synchronization that the threads used to make sure they ran in the desired order. This would be specific to the code in the threads.
  5. See answer to #3
  6. Volatile is a way to make sure that a particular variable can be properly shared between different threads. It is necessary on multi-processor machines (which almost everyone has these days) to make sure the value of the variable is consistent between the processors. It is effectively a way to synchronize a single value.
  7. Read about deadlocking in more general terms to understand this. Once you first understand mutual exclusion and locking you will be able to understand how deadlocks can happen.
  8. I have not read the materials that you read, so I don't understand this one. Sorry.
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Do you have any suggestions on a beginner's guide to concurrency? Or multiple guides to separate parts of concurrency? –  Apothem Jan 4 '12 at 19:13

I find that the examples used to explain synchronization and volatility are contrived and difficult to understand the purpose of. Here are my preferred examples:

Synchronized:

private Value value;

public void setValue(Value v) {
  value = v;
}

public void doSomething() {
  if(value != null) {
    doFirstThing();
    int val = value.getInt(); // Will throw NullPointerException if another
                              // thread calls setValue(null);
    doSecondThing(val);
  }
}

The above code is perfectly correct if run in a single-threaded environment. However with even 2 threads there is the possibility that value will be changed in between the check and when it is used. This is because the method doSomething() is not atomic.

To address this, use synchronization:

private Value value;
private Object lock = new Object();

public void setValue(Value v) {
  synchronized(lock) {
    value = v;
  }
}

public void doSomething() {
  synchronized(lock) { // Prevents setValue being called by another thread.
    if(value != null) {
      doFirstThing();
      int val = value.getInt(); // Cannot throw NullPointerException.
      doSecondThing(val);
    }
  }
}

Volatile:

private boolean running = true;

// Called by Thread 1.
public void run() {
  while(running) {
    doSomething();
  }
}

// Called by Thread 2.
public void stop() {
  running = false;
}

To explain this requires knowledge of the Java Memory Model. It is worth reading about in depth, but the short version for this example is that Threads have their own copies of variables which are only sync'd to main memory on a synchronized block and when a volatile variable is reached. The Java compiler (specifically the JIT) is allowed to optimise the code into this:

public void run() {
  while(true) { // Will never end
    doSomething();
  }
}

To prevent this optimisation you can set a variable to be volatile, which forces the thread to access main memory every time it reads the variable. Note that this is unnecessary if you are using synchronized statements as both keywords cause a sync to main memory.

I haven't addressed your questions directly as Francis did so. I hope these examples can give you an idea of the concepts in a better way than the examples you saw in the Oracle tutorial.

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