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The example below illustrates a more complex but not dissimilar problem I've been trying to solve elegantly. I have a set of templates which must be specialized and, in doing so, implement one or both of two interfaces: Readable and Writable, in each specialization. Specific implements both interfaces, and is then tested using main:

class Readable
{
protected:

    int values[3];

public:

    Readable()
    {
        // Does nothing.
    }

    int operator()(int i) const
    {
        return values[i];
    }
};

class Writable : public Readable
{
public:

    Writable()
    {
        // Does nothing.
    }

    using Readable::operator ();
    int& operator()(int i)
    {
        return values[i];
    }
};

class Specific : public Writable
{
};

void write_test(Specific& specific)
{
    // Error C2106: '=' : left operand must be l-value
    specific(0) = 1;
}

int main()
{
    Specific s;
    write_test(s);

    return 0;
}

The code above fails on VS 2008, 2010 with the following:

error C2106: '=' : left operand must be l-value.

This strikes me as odd: have I overlooked something simple? I've compiled and run exactly this code using the [] operator, and all was well (as it should and always has been). It would appear to be some issue relating specifically to the behavior of this operator, an issue I am unfamiliar with.

share|improve this question
    
Compiles fine in GCC, guessing it's a MSVC bug. –  Pubby Jan 4 '12 at 3:52
    
I edited my original post because there was some confusion (my fault while furiously editing, no doubt) about the nature of my problem. –  Liam M Jan 4 '12 at 3:57
2  
Do you get the same error with int& i = specific(0); i = 1; –  Chris Bednarski Jan 4 '12 at 4:00
2  
@abelenky one operator() is const. The other one isn't. virtual will not do anything in this case. –  Chris Bednarski Jan 4 '12 at 4:02
3  
What if you say specific.operator()(0) = 1; ? –  John Zwinck Jan 4 '12 at 4:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is a compiler error: the using declaration should work. To work around the problem just use delegation:

class Writable: public Readable {
    ...
    int operator()(int i) const { return Readable::operator()(i); }
    ...
};

This implementation is longer than the implementation actually delegated to but it avoids problems if the version in Readable ever changes.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Dietmar, this is what I've done myself, and seems to be the most elegant work around. It's still a pain in the butt, though, and seems like a minor issue in the compiler (compared to others). –  Liam M Jan 4 '12 at 5:37

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