Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a very long query that is essentially an extension of the following:

update  property.lease_period
set     scca_uplift = '110',
        scca_notes_code = '21006'
where   (suite_id = 'CCBG08' and lease_id = '205059')
        or (suite_id = 'CCBG14' and lease_id = '152424')
        or (suite_id = 'CCCF048' and lease_id = '150659')

The where clause for this will have ~40 rows when complete. In order to make this task easier I was hoping to do something similar to the following:

update  property.lease_period
set     scca_uplift = '110',
        scca_notes_code = '21006'
where   suite_id in('CCBG08', 'CCBG14', 'CCCF048')
        and lease_id in('205059', '152424', '150659')

Unfortunately lease_id isn't a unique field and there can be multiple lease_id's to the same suite_id (so subsequently the second query is unusable).

Is there a better way to do the first update statement given that this solution won't work?

share|improve this question
    
Can all these 40 suite_id and lease_id be selected by a SELECT query. –  Ravi Kumar Singh Jan 4 '12 at 3:55
    
Yes, most certainly –  ElvisLikeBear Jan 4 '12 at 4:02

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You may create table type and pass the values thru it, like that:

CREATE TYPE Suite_Lease AS TABLE
(
suite_id varchar(15) NOT NULL,
lease_id varchar(15) NOT NULL
)
GO
CREATE PROC DoUpdate
  @Params Suite_Lease READONLY,
  @uplift varchar(15),
  @code varchar(15)
AS
  update  property.lease_period  set
     scca_uplift = @uplift,
     scca_notes_code = @code
  from property.lease_period tab
  JOIN @params filt
    on tab.suite_id=filt.suite_id AND tab.lease_id=filt.lease_id

This will keep your Procedure cache dry and clean, instead if you using multiple "big" where clauses

How to pass table parameter into stored procedure (c#):

        DataTable dt = new DataTable();
        dt.Columns.Add(new DataColumn("suite_id", typeof (string)) {AllowDBNull = false, MaxLength = 15});
        dt.Columns.Add(new DataColumn("lease_id", typeof (string)) {AllowDBNull = false, MaxLength = 15});
        dt.Rows.Add("CCBG08", "205059");

        ... add more rows for match

        using (var c = new SqlConnection("ConnectionString"))
        {
            c.Open();
            using(var sc = c.CreateCommand())
            {
                sc.CommandText = "DoUpdate";
                sc.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
                sc.Parameters.AddWithValue("@uplift", "110");
                sc.Parameters.AddWithValue("@code", "21006");
                sc.Parameters.Add(new SqlParameter("@Params", SqlDbType.Structured) { TypeName = null, Value = dt });
                sc.ExecuteNonQuery();
            }
        }
share|improve this answer
    
I don't actually, but can Google for the information, much appreciated! –  ElvisLikeBear Jan 4 '12 at 4:08
    
Actually I'm on my way to work, so if you wait for 40 min - i'll provide you an example –  Oleg Dok Jan 4 '12 at 4:13
    
You need an example in c#? –  Oleg Dok Jan 4 '12 at 4:49
    
Would be beneficial for sure –  ElvisLikeBear Jan 4 '12 at 4:52
    
Updated the answer –  Oleg Dok Jan 4 '12 at 5:04

Using the trick from this article. This looks a bit ugly, but it does the trick:

update property.lease_period
set scca_uplift = @uplift, scca_notes_code = @code
from property.lease_period tab
JOIN (
    select 'CCBG08' as suite_id, '205059' as lease_id union all
    select 'CCBG14', '152424' union all
    select 'CCCF048', '150659'
) xxx
on tab.suite_id=xxx.suite_id AND tab.lease_id=xxx.lease_id
share|improve this answer
    
It's interesting from an educational point of view but somewhat impractical as its readability is quite poor (and there's a good chance this statement will be looked over by others in the future). Upvote all the same as I do think there's something to be taken away from this. –  ElvisLikeBear Jan 4 '12 at 4:58
1  
@Michael I wish you were asking about Oracle, it's a lot cleaner there: you do where (lease_period,lease_id) in (('CCBG08','205059'),('CCBG14','152424'),('CCCF048','150659')), and it does the trick. Why SQL Server couldn't do it is beyond me. –  dasblinkenlight Jan 4 '12 at 5:02
    
Found this interesting and created a new answer from it (using concatenation). Appreciated. –  ElvisLikeBear Jan 4 '12 at 6:03

Try this

update  property.lease_period
set     scca_uplift = '110',
        scca_notes_code = '21006'
where   (suite_id in,lease_id) in 
        (select   suite_id in,lease_id from XXX_table where CONDITION)

The last SELECT should give you those 40 combinations.

share|improve this answer
    
Assuming I'm interpreting this correctly although this would work in most instances (hence the upvote) unfortunately it won't work in this specific one as there's no where condition that would only supply me with those 40 records without duplicating what I have for the first statement above. –  ElvisLikeBear Jan 4 '12 at 4:35
    
Thats not a T-SQL, will not work @ sql server –  Oleg Dok Jan 4 '12 at 5:24

Derived from a comment by @dasblinkenlight (for Oracle) another possible way to do this would be the following:

select  *
from    property.lease_period
where   (suite_id + ' ' + lease_id) 
        in (
            ('CCBG08 205059'),
            ('CCBG14 152424'),
            ('CCCF048 150659')
        )

This isn't very recommended as it would be bad for indexing (concatenation on MicrosoftSQL) however I thought it was interesting all the same.

dasblinkenlights original comment:

@Michael I wish you were asking about Oracle, it's a lot cleaner there: you do where (lease_period,lease_id) in (('CCBG08','205059'),('CCBG14','152424'),('CCCF048','150659')), and it does the trick. Why SQL Server couldn't do it is beyond me. –

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.