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Is this possible? I am creating a an object from a JSON string with this code:

String obj = new Gson().toJson(jsonArray.getJSONObject(i));
String className = getClassName(jsonArray.getJSONObject(i));

Class targetClass = null;
try {
    targetClass = Class.forName(className);
} catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
}

//Create Object
Object data = new Gson().fromJson(obj, targetClass);

I then do some database stuff, get a return key value and I want to set that key on the bean object using its setId() setter, but I don't want to have to cast the specific type of object to the generic object because that would require my repeating the exact same code many times just to cast the object.

key = contactsListDAO.manageDataObj(data, sql, true);
((PhoneNumber) data).setId(key);

Can I use some sort of if statement to check if the object contains an id property and then set the id on the generic object without having to cast?

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

reflection can do that but I think maybe here you should do something else. Write a utility function

public static <T> T fromJson(String json, Class<T> clzz)
{
return (T) new Gson().fromJson(obj, targetClass);
}

and then you can call it like so

PhoneNumber data = fromJson(obj, PhoneNumber.class); 

no more conversion.

EDIT : if using "Object" is a constraint you can use reflection

public void  setIdOnObject(Object obj, Object id)
    {
        try{
         Method m =  obj.getClass().getMethod("setId",id.getClass());
            m.invoke(obj, id );

        }catch(NoSuchMethodException  e){ return false; } catch (InvocationTargetException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();  //To change body of catch statement use File | Settings | File Templates.
        } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();  //To change body of catch statement use File | Settings | File Templates.
        }
    }

Here is a working example I have, just copy-paste-run.

import java.lang.reflect.InvocationTargetException;
public class Reflection
{

    public static void main( String[] args )
    {
        MyParent p = new MyParent();
        setParentKey( p, "parentKey" );

        MyObj o = new MyObj();
        setParentKey( o, "myParentKey" );
        setMyKey( o, "myKey" );

        System.out.println( "p = " + p );
        System.out.println( "o = " + o );

    }



    public static void invokeMethod( Object p, Object k, String methodName )
    {
        try
        {
            p.getClass().getMethod( methodName, k.getClass() ).invoke( p, k );
        }
        catch ( NoSuchMethodException e )
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        catch ( InvocationTargetException e )
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        catch ( IllegalAccessException e )
        {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    public static void setParentKey( Object p, Object k )
    {
           invokeMethod( p,k,"setParentKey" );
    }

    public static void setMyKey( Object p, Object k )
    {
        invokeMethod( p,k,"setMyKey" );
    }

    public static class MyParent
    {
        private Object parentKey;
        public void setParentKey( String k )
        {
            parentKey = k;
        }

        @Override
        public String toString()
        {
            return "MyParent{" +
                           "parentKey=" + parentKey +
                           '}';
        }
    }

    public static class MyObj extends MyParent
    {
        private Object myKey;
        public void setMyKey( String k )
        {
            myKey = k;
        }

        @Override
        public String toString()
        {
            return "MyObj{" +
                           "myKey=" + myKey +
                           "} " + super.toString();
        }
    }
}

And the expected output is :

p = MyParent{parentKey=parentKey}
o = MyObj{myKey=myKey} MyParent{parentKey=myParentKey}
share|improve this answer
    
I don't want to have to call the object by its type though. I have multiple bean types that access this class, and do everything exactly the same. They all have an id property, so its safe to set my key on any object that will be accessing the class. However, a check to verify its available would be nice. – ryandlf Jan 4 '12 at 5:35
    
I know the class, so that looks like a good way to check for the property. What about setting the key on the object without casting the bean type though? – ryandlf Jan 4 '12 at 5:58
    
changed my edit to suite your needs - no need to convert anything. it checks if there is a method and invokes it. – guy mograbi Jan 4 '12 at 6:03
    
I had to remove my accepted answer, because after some testing, this method does not work. Invoke is not setting the property and this keeps returning a NoSuchMethodException. – ryandlf Jan 4 '12 at 7:01
    
The code should work. I added a working example I tested with output from execution. If you want to give more details as to why it didn't work for you I will take a look. – guy mograbi Jan 4 '12 at 7:50

If you have (as you mention) "multiple bean types" and "they all have an id property", why don't you define a common interface for you beans with a setId method?

You'll get your beans and just cast to the interface which will be a safe and object-oriented approach. Is it a viable solution for you?

share|improve this answer
    
The id property of the beans is about the only property that is matching. Would your solution still be a better approach? – ryandlf Jan 4 '12 at 6:11
    
Definitely. Using any kind of non Object type is much better as java is a strong type language. If you use an interface you can then use the function I proposed earlier. public static <T> T fromJson(String json, Class<T> clzz) – guy mograbi Jan 4 '12 at 7:53

Here is my working code. For some reason I could never find the method using class.getMethod() so I had to loop through an array of methods and match the names to the setId method that I knew existed. From there using invoke was the key to setting the property correctly.

public void setIdOnObject(Object obj, int id, Class<?> targetClass) {
    Method[] methods = targetClass.getMethods();
    for(Method i : methods) {
        if(i.getName().equals("setId")) {
            try {
                i.invoke(obj, id);
            } catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            } catch (InvocationTargetException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }           
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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