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One of actions in Struts2 is using below code:

java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService myservice = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();
myservice.execute(new myTask(user, "add"));

Here, myTask is inner class which implements Runnable interface.

Can I invoke the above code from other action class as well by passing parameter a shown below:

java.util.concurrent.ExecutorService myservice = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();
myservice.execute(new myTask(user, "delete"));

In Run method, I'll check the action & if its add, perform some activity, if its update, perform other activity....

Also, from another 3rd action class, can I invoke the same above thread by passing another action, say "update"???

class myTask implements Runnable{
private User user = null;

private String action = null;

myTask(User user, String action){
    this.user = user;
    this.action = action;
}

public void run(){
        if (action.equals("add")) {
                           performAdd(user);
                    } else if (action.equals("delete")) {
                           performDelete(user);
                    }
    }

Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

No - Runnable.run doesn't take any parameters, so how would you expect the "delete" part to be provided to you?

Just use the first form - create the Runnable instance with all the information it needs to know so that it can do its work. Alternatively, I would probably create three different implementations of Runnable - one for add, one for delete, and one for update. If you want to do one of three things, why switch on data at execution time when you can use polymorphism?

share|improve this answer
    
In myTask constructor, I'll pasing this parameter which are different actions. And then in Run method, I'll check if action is add, then do addition, else do something else....Can I do like that? –  Mike Jan 4 '12 at 6:34
    
@Mike you can do it your way, though Jon's is more OOP. If you do it your way, at least consider using an enum for the operation (add, delete, etc.) instead of a String. –  user949300 Jan 4 '12 at 6:40
    
This is what polymorphism was made for. Have an UpdateTask, a DeleteTask and an AddTask which all implement Runnable. Then you simply need to do a myservice.execute(new AddTask(user)) –  Yuushi Jan 4 '12 at 6:41
    
Yuushi, if I add 3 inner classes UpdateTask, DeleteTak & AddTask which will implement runnable interface, then I'll have to provide implementation through run method for all of those & then, I'll have to call them using different variables like myservice.execute(new AddTask(user)); Similarly myservice.execute(new updateTask(user));...Isn't this increasing a lot of code unnecessarily when I could write reusable code?? –  Mike Jan 4 '12 at 6:46
    
@Mike: In what way is it increasing the amount of code? Where is the "reusable" code here? If those tasks do all have something in common, then put the commonality into an abstract base class. Deciding what to do based on a string value which is known at compile-time is ugly compared with using separate classes. –  Jon Skeet Jan 4 '12 at 7:01

If you have a lot of different operations, you could do something like this. Not many Java developers know that enums can be used in this way and thus it can be confusing. Therefore you should use it sparingly, but when it makes sense it can be quite convenient :)

 enum Op {
    ADD{
        public void perform(Dao dao, User user){
            // do stuff
        }
    },
     UPDATE{
         public void perform(Dao dao, User user){
             // do stuff
         }
     },
     DELETE{
         public void perform(Dao dao, User user){
             // do stuff
         }
     };
    public abstract void perform(Dao dao);
}

class Mytask{
    // [...] 
    public void run(){
        // stuff
        this.op.perform(dao, user);
        // stuff
    }
}

input = "ADD";
service.execute(new MyTask(Op.valueOf(input), user));
share|improve this answer

A much simpler approach is to use an anonymous class.

ExecutorService mySservice = Executors.newSingleThreadExecutor();


final User user = 
mySservice.execute(new Runnable() { 
    public void run() {
         performAdd(user);
    }
});
// using the same myService
mySservice.execute(new Runnable() { 
    public void run() {
         performDelete(user);
    }
});
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