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Maybe this has been asked before (where I didn't find it)...

I have a java.util.Set of aprox. 50000 Strings. I would like to generate some sort of hash to check if it has been changed (comparing hashes of two versions of the Set)?

If the Set changes, the hash has to be different.

How can that be achieved? Thanks!

EDIT:
Sorry for that misleading wording. I don't want to check if "it" has been changed (the same instance). Instead I want to check if two database queries, which are generating two - maybe identical - instances of a Set of Strings are equal.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Based on this statement:

If the Set changes, the hash has to be different

It really can't be achieved, unless you have more constraints. In general, a hash is a value in some fixed space. For example, your hash may be a 32 bit integer, so there are 2^32 possible hash values. In general, b bits gets you 2^b possible hash values. In order to achieve what you want, you have to make sure that every possible set (i.e. - the set of all sets!) is less than or equal to 2^b. But my guess is that you can have arbitrary strings so this isn't possible. And even if it was possible, you'd have to come up with a way to map onto the hash space, which can be challenging.

However, with a good hash function, it's not very likely that changing the set will end up producing the same hash value. So you can use the hash to determine inequality, but if the hash is the same, you still need to check for equality. (This is the same idea behind a hash set or a hash map, where elements map to buckets based on a hashcode, but you have to check for equality).

Similar to what Paul mentioned but different: you can instead make a set implementation that has version numbers and ensure that you always generate a new version number when the set is mutated. Then you can compare the version number? I'm not sure if you care about immutable sets or whether the mutable set changes back to a version you have seen (i.e. - if it should always get the same version).

Hope this helps.

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Yes, this helps, as it shows me that my approach was not in the right direction. Thank you! –  Zeemee Jan 4 '12 at 8:22
1  
@Mulmoth - great! Keep in mind that hashes are still great though, and they can be cacheable too. You might see a great performance increase. To suggest any other approach, I'd need to better understand your pattern of access to see how you can optimize things, but this is a good start. –  Tom Jan 4 '12 at 8:27

I'd try using java.util.AbstractSet's hashCode method, as stated in the documentation:

Returns the hash code value for this set. The hash code of a set is defined to be the sum of the hash codes of the elements in the set, where the hash code of a null element is defined to be zero. This ensures that s1.equals(s2) implies that s1.hashCode()==s2.hashCode() for any two sets s1 and s2, as required by the general contract of Object.hashCode().

Of course, this only works if your Set implementation extends from AbstractSet, I suppose you use e.g. java.util.HashSet. As always there is a chance of hash collision.

Alternatively, you could extend an existing Set implementation and override the state changing methods, this may make sense if hash computation for each object becomes too expensive, like:

class ChangeSet<E> extends java.util.HashSet<E> {
    private boolean changed = false;

    @Override
    public boolean add(E e) {
        changed = true;
        super.add(e);
    }

    public void commit() {
        changed = false;
    }

    public boolean isChanged() {
        return changed;
    }

    /* and all the other methods (addAll, remove, removeAll, etc.) */

}
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1  
This is wrong. The set can change and still end up having the same hashCode. The implication is one-way. When they are equal, hashcode must be the same. But just because hashcodes are the same does not mean they are equal. –  Tom Jan 4 '12 at 7:52
1  
@Tom: Of course, as I wrote there still is a chance of hash collision. If this must be avoided under all circumstances, hashing is the wrong approach (I highlighted the sentence). –  home Jan 4 '12 at 7:56
    
@Tom it is not wrong; the OP specifically asks for a hash, so you have to assume that they are aware of the possibility of false positives, and comfortable with it. –  Mike Nakis Jan 4 '12 at 8:02
    
Removed my downvote since you added that there is the chance for collision :-). Sorry if that was there in the beginning, I didn't notice it. –  Tom Jan 4 '12 at 8:07
1  
@Tom wh00ps, I did not notice the elephant in the room. So, I take back what I said. –  Mike Nakis Jan 4 '12 at 8:23

If you need to improve the performance of hashCode (as it rather expensive for a large Set) you can cache it and update it as you go.

    class MyHashSet<E> extends LinkedHashSet<E> {
    int hashCode = 0;
    @Override
    public boolean add(E e) {
        if (super.add(e)) {
            hashCode ^= e.hashCode();
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public boolean remove(Object o) {
        if(super.remove(o)) {
            hashCode ^= o.hashCode();
            return true;
        }
        return false;
    }

    @Override
    public void clear() {
        super.clear();
        hashCode = 0;
    }

    @Override
    public int hashCode() {
        return hashCode;
    }
}
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+1 for using XOR rather than adding the hash codes together –  Paul Jan 4 '12 at 8:26
    
+ and - should be the same, even with overflow and underflow, but ^ is simpler to see how it works. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 4 '12 at 8:32

Sometimes simpler is better. I suggest writing your own Set implementation. In it, override the add and remove methods so they set a flag if the Set is modified. Add a getter for the flag, isModified, and you don't have to worry about hash overhead or collisions. Just call MyCustomSet.isModified.

Alternately you can call Collections.unmodifiableSet to get a wrapper around your Set that can't be modified. An exception will be thrown if code attempts to modify the set.

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Maybe "two versions of the Set" was misleading. I like to compare two different instances. –  Zeemee Jan 4 '12 at 8:02
1  
+1: A similar approach is to use a modicationCount. When the modifcationCount is different to the last time you checked, the Set has changed. –  Peter Lawrey Jan 4 '12 at 8:04
1  
@Mulmoth - do the sets start out to be the same? You could then capture the changes and compare those instead. Perhaps it would instead be better to rethink a design that requires comparing two sets of 50,000 strings. If you can't avoid it, maybe an embedded database might be a better option? I think you'll have a hard time balancing performance with collision avoidance. –  Paul Jan 4 '12 at 8:08
    
Thank you Paul, your idea doesn't fit in my situation, but it is useful though - I will keep it in mind. –  Zeemee Jan 4 '12 at 8:23

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