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If I want the following result :

RIPEMD-160("The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog") =
 37f332f68db77bd9d7edd4969571ad671cf9dd3b

I tried this :

string hash11 = System.Text.Encoding.ASCII.GetString(RIPEMD.ComputeHash(Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes("The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog")));

but it doesn't give me the previous result!

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The ComputeHash function gives you a byte array with the values in it (0x37, 0xF3, ...). If you use GetString it will take every value in the byte and use the character with that value, it will not convert the value into a string.

You could convert it like that:

var bytes = RIPEMD.ComputeHash(Encoding.ASCII.GetBytes("The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog"));
string hash11 = "";
foreach(var curByte in bytes)
    hash11 = curByte.ToString("X2") + hash11; // or curByte.ToString("X") if for example 9 should not get 09

Like that you have the highest byte at the beginning. With

hash11 += curByte.ToString("X2")

you have the lowest byte at the beginning.

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3BDDF91C67AD719596D4EDD7D97BB78DF632F337 !! –  just_name Jan 4 '12 at 8:25
    
Ye, thats the right string, just read it from behind: 37F332F68DB77BD9D7EDD4969571AD671CF9DD3B As i stated in my answer you need to append the bytes either at the start of the end of the string, depending if you want the highest byte first or last. –  Muepe Jan 4 '12 at 8:40
    
I want the following : 37f332f68db77bd9d7edd4969571ad671cf9dd3b –  just_name Jan 4 '12 at 8:50
    
how to reverse this? –  just_name Jan 4 '12 at 8:52
1  
Well, and whats now the problem? Is it because the letters are uppercase? If so you can steer that with the X in ToString. Using X gives uppercase, x lowercase. /Edit: Just read your other comment: Just use the other way then. If you now use hash11 = curByte.ToString("X2") + hash11; use hash11 += curByte.ToString("X2"); instead and vice versa. –  Muepe Jan 4 '12 at 8:53

What you want to get is the hex representation of the byte array: each byte should be represented by its two-character hex value.

You can check this thread for several different examples on how to do that.

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