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I have simple else if and have errors on the word syntax - for. Please help me to fix this

Error   4   error C2143: syntax error : missing ';' before 'type'   
Error   7   error C2143: syntax error : missing ';' before '{'
Error   3   error C2143: syntax error : missing ')' before 'type'   
Error   6   error C2059: syntax error : ')' 

My code is checking which array is bigger and puts the bigger. Thats my all fnction:

void PrintIdentical(...)
{
    int i;
    int smaller;


     ...

    for (i = 0; i < smaller; i++)
    {
        printf ("%d", arrA[i]);
       printf ("%d", arrB[i]);
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Are you properly closing the body of the function definition? Perhaps you are, but but you haven't posted the entire function definition, so wondering in case you missed that. – Shamim Hafiz Jan 4 '12 at 8:21
    
The code above is not complete. – obounaim Jan 4 '12 at 8:23
    
Could you post some of the code surrounding enticl()? – hmjd Jan 4 '12 at 8:24
    
read man 3 printf – Fredrik Pihl Jan 4 '12 at 8:24
    
I have updated the code – Alexxx Jan 4 '12 at 8:25
up vote 4 down vote accepted
for (int i = 0; ...

This syntax is C99, it is not allowed in previous standards. Since you've already declared i, you can just change that to:

for (i = 0; ...

If you want a block-level i in there anyway (it will shadow the i that you defined earlier in your function), then use:

int i;
for (i = 0; ...

or get a compiler that supports C99.

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This code should compile, unless you actually forgot to close your function with a trailing }.

One other issue could be the redeclaration of i. I've seen this on some compilers. Also, a note - in the for loop you don't need to redeclare i, you can use the existing declaration.

I'm also assuming you defined the function print yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
All compilers I've worked with can handle a declaration of a variable inside a block with the same name like that. However, some debuggers can't, so maybe that threw you off? – Mr Lister Jan 4 '12 at 8:34
    
It doesn't throw me off, compiling with gcc (can't remember the version) under solaris definetely gives the error. – Luchian Grigore Jan 4 '12 at 8:41
    
There seems to be some confusion over what "declaring a variable in a for loop" means. Sorry. I meant if you have int i; for (...) {int i;} that should always be correct. However with for (int i = ...) compilers don't all agree with the specs and then the problems start. – Mr Lister Jan 6 '12 at 9:49

If you are strictly using C, you can't declare variables inside the For loop body as you are doing now. I have tried this using GCC and i got compile error.

error: 'for' loop initial declaration used outside C99 mode

Also, you seem to be re-declaring i, and some compilers won't able to detect that as a new scope.

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1  
So it depends on whether this is C99 or not. Also, I don't know a single compiler that can't handle redefinitions like that. It's in the specs! – Mr Lister Jan 4 '12 at 8:29
    
@MrLister: I tried to compile it on codepad.org, selecting C, and I got that error. As for redefinition, I recall that VC++ 6.0, complained if we re-declared a variable inside a for loop. It has been a long time though, since I used VC++ 6.0. – Shamim Hafiz Jan 4 '12 at 8:36
    
VC++6 complains if you declare a variable after it's declared in a for clause. VC++6 used the 'pre-standard style' scoping for variables declared in the for clause - that is, the variable remained 'alive' after the end of the for loop. So you couldn't have another definition of the variable name after the for loop. Just for completeness, VC6 (compiling C code) didn't permit variable declarations in a for clause (or after the first non-declaration statement in a block). Unfortunately, that's still the case for MSVC when compiling C code. – Michael Burr Jan 4 '12 at 9:09
void enticl(int arrA[], int arrA_size, int arrB[], int arrB_size)
{
    int i;
    int smaller;
    int *arr;

    if(arrA_size>arrB_size)
    {
        smaller=arrB_size;
        arr = arrB;
    }
    else
    {
        smaller=arrA_size;
        arr = arrB;

    }

    for(i = 0; i < smaller; i++) 
    {
        printf("%d\n", arr[i]);
    }
}
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