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I have to import and work with a C++ Project. However, I can´t get it to run without Microsoft Visual Studio. The Author of the project told me, I have to use a Microsoft Compiler, because only this one can handle particular notations he used (e.g. creating Objects on the fly while passing it to a method). See example.

lights.push_back(Light(Vector(dirx,diry,dirz).normalize(), Color(colr, colg, colb)));

I had to create an vector object before and pass it to the method.

Can anyone tell me which compiler I can use? I dont have enough bit flow to download 3 gb Visual Studio. Great but not necessary would be a compiler that I can use on Mac OS.

cheers.

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You can download Visual Studio 2010 Express Edition, which is around 700MB. –  vidit Jan 4 '12 at 9:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Any C++ compiler can 'create objects on the fly while passing it to a function' (these are often known as temporary objects or rvalues).

What Visual C++ can do that other C++ compilers generally can't is pass those temporary objects to functions through parameters that are non-const references. The C++ standard specifically forbids that behavior, but MSVC allows it (Microsoft calls it an extension).

I'm guessing that that is the behavior the Author of the project is depending on.

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you are right. My knowledge on this was very unprecise. So I go with MSVC, I`m assuming I don´t have alternatives? –  dan Jan 4 '12 at 9:31
    
I don't think GCC has an option to support this behavior, I'm not sure about other compilers that might claim closer compatibility with MSVC (Intel or Comeau?). Is there a particular compiler you're considering? It may also pay to look at whether those references should be changed to be const if they can. –  Michael Burr Jan 4 '12 at 9:37
    
And if bandwidth is an issue for getting Visual Studio, are you sure you can't get someone to download the ISO and burn a DVD for you? –  Michael Burr Jan 4 '12 at 9:40
    
This is, even by MS people, called an 'evil extension' and code that uses it generally ignores const-correctness which makes it hard to fix. –  pmr Jan 4 '12 at 9:44
    
I can ask a buddy, but stackoverflow is quicker :) I will try Visual C++ express first, cause it seems to be a lightweitght compared to Studio. Thank you guys anyway. –  dan Jan 4 '12 at 9:52

If you are working on Mac OS, then the default compiler is (for recent version) Clang (based on LLVM).

And you are lucky in that Clang has a compatibility mode for parsing MSVC code that is normally quite advanced. The current top of the tree version is able to parse near every MFC generated header for example.

You can activate this mode using -fms-extensions.

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pardon me, I type it in the Terminal? Clang -fms-extensions main.cpp ? It shows the same errors. Do I do something wrong? –  dan Jan 4 '12 at 10:05
    
Well, first it means that Clang is already installed, which is good news :) And unfortunately it may be that Clang has not been extended with this yet... you can try -fms-compatibility as well, however if I remember correctly it was for generating compatible code... the border between the two options is still blurry though, so maybe worth a try. –  Matthieu M. Jan 4 '12 at 10:14
    
Sadly that doesnt work either. I just saw I have Clang 2.0 installed. I can´t find an update tho. –  dan Jan 4 '12 at 10:30
    
@dan: the latest (released) version is clang 3.0, however I know that Apple "repackages" it, so perhaps that they change the version number... I'm sorry it didn't work for you. –  Matthieu M. Jan 4 '12 at 12:51

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