Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I have a web application that uses the Web Service created in ASP.NET. In this, web service I want to pass an collection object of Key Value type (i.e. something like Hashtable or Dictionay).

But we cannot use objects that implements from IDictionary.

I do not want to create a serialized class in my web service.

Can anyone suggest me the best approach for this?

share|improve this question
2  
Why can't you use dictionaries and why would you purposefully avoid writing a serialized class? –  Juliet May 16 '09 at 14:06
    
You can't use a type that inherits from IDictionary as web method return type –  Vnuk Mar 9 '10 at 19:42

5 Answers 5

dev.e.loper is almost right. You can use a List<Pair>.

Alternatively, you can use List<KeyValuePair<TKey,TValue>>.

MSDN Documentation:

share|improve this answer

I'm not totally clear on your question, but maybe you are needing something like this?

using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Xml;
using System.Xml.Schema;
using System.Xml.Serialization;

[XmlRoot("dictionary")]
public class SerializableDictionary<TKey, TValue> : Dictionary<TKey, TValue>, IXmlSerializable
{
    public XmlSchema GetSchema()
    {
        return null;
    }

    public void ReadXml(XmlReader reader)
    {
        var keySerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(TKey));
        var valueSerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(TValue));

        bool wasEmpty = reader.IsEmptyElement;
        reader.Read();

        if (wasEmpty)
        {
            return;
        }

        while (reader.NodeType != XmlNodeType.EndElement)
        {
            reader.ReadStartElement("item");

            reader.ReadStartElement("key");
            var key = (TKey)keySerializer.Deserialize(reader);
            reader.ReadEndElement();

            reader.ReadStartElement("value");
            var value = (TValue)valueSerializer.Deserialize(reader);
            reader.ReadEndElement();

            this.Add(key, value);
            reader.ReadEndElement();
            reader.MoveToContent();
        }

        reader.ReadEndElement();
    }

    public void WriteXml(XmlWriter writer)
    {
        var keySerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(TKey));
        var valueSerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(TValue));

        foreach (var key in this.Keys)
        {
            writer.WriteStartElement("item");
            writer.WriteStartElement("key");
            keySerializer.Serialize(writer, key);
            writer.WriteEndElement();
            writer.WriteStartElement("value");
            TValue value = this[key];
            valueSerializer.Serialize(writer, value);
            writer.WriteEndElement();
            writer.WriteEndElement();
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

You can inherit from KeyedCollection which is Serializable.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms132438.aspx

share|improve this answer

I solved this by using DictionaryEntry

The only difference is that Key is Object as well.

I basically have a Dictionary ToDictionary(DictionaryEntry[] entries) and a DictionaryEntry[] FromDictionary(Dictionary entries) static methods which are very light weight and end up getting me to the same place without having to make my own collection class.

The added benefit is that the XML which comes as a result is closer to that in which the WCF Web Services use by default! That means you can make this change now in your client code and be ready for WCF if you decide to move that way.

The result looks like this over JSON [{"Key": key1, "Value": value1}, {"Key": key2, "Value": value2}] exactly the same as it does over WCF by default.

share|improve this answer

You could try to use 2 arrays, 1 for keys and one for values, where the indexes of the arrays match up. Not the most ideal solution but a valid one. The internals of the webservice you can use IDictionary and just pass out the Keys and Values of that object.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.