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I am relatively new to parallel programming and want to accomplish the following task in c++ by openmp.

I have some (lets say 4) relative complex objects/calculations to do. All of them are similar, but too complex to parallelize each of them (so they run serial). So my idea was to use a different thread/cpu for each of them, meaning I want to to spread the calculations over my cores. Though this might not be the most efficient usage of parallelism in this context, it might be the easiest to achieve (because of the high complexity of each calculation).

While this would work by

#pragma omp parallel
{
    #pragma omp for
    for(int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
    {
       obj[i].calculate();    
    }
}

I want to exchange further information between this objects, for example an integer (or a more complex object) "a" should be modified during each calculation (though I can not forecast when and how often, but especially mostly more then once). If it is modified, the information needs to be incorporated into each other calculation as well. While the specific exchange of the information is (again) relatively complex, this is done by the "calculate" methods (implicitly) as well. In general this should look like above, with the additional integer "a", which is written on and read from by all the calculation methods:

int a;
#pragma omp parallel
{
   #pragma omp for
   for(int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
   {
       obj[i].calculate();    
   }
}

So my question is, how can i prevent a "data race" on "a"? Meaning how can I generate an object, which may only be accessed by one thread at each time without going into details with in the "calculation" methods themselves? Does openmp offer this functionality, and if not, which library does?

Best regards and thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Locking up the 'a' for the entire time any calculation will need it is fairly simple, but this will effectively serialize your calculations, yes? Can all your calcuations survive having a possibly-complex 'a' being asynchronously changed by another thread, (I suspect not!)? If not, is it possible to identify points in each calculation where is is safe for them to accept a new 'a'? If they accept a new 'a' at some intermediate point, does this invalidate the results from that calculation run? –  Martin James Jan 4 '12 at 10:30
    
I am not sure if I understand your comment. The calculations may be "long" (up to days), "a" has additional character, knowledge of an "updated" "a" may save considerable amount of time, but it is not needed for functionality. So the check for a new "a" is repeated very often but will be negative most of the time (no new "a"). So an "old" "a" does not harm, but a wrong (asynchron?) does. In my eye, the problem lies in modifying the "a" from one thread, while reading from another. –  Martin Jan 4 '12 at 10:47
    
My problem was in understanding how changing parameters, (even if done 'cleanly' so that all the 'a' is changed 'atomically'), at some intermediate, and unknown, stage in a calculation could result in anything good - some of the calculation would be done with the old 'a' and some with the new 'a' - to me, this would be a bad thing. Your reply, though, signals something important - the calculations ask for a new 'a' at suitable points, (though the request may be denied if no now 'a' available). This makes things a lot easier. –  Martin James Jan 4 '12 at 11:03
    
If you 'a' is acessed via a pointer, can you not just change the pointer in some variable accessible to all the threads? Don't free/dispose of any stale 'a's because some of threads will be using the old one for a while - just leave them around until the end of your run. –  Martin James Jan 4 '12 at 11:15

2 Answers 2

Judging from your description I am not sure whether parallel execution will help you at all when each thread has to wait for updated information of a.

Anyways, you can update variables without race condition with flush, atomic and critical directives. The best choice heavily depends which threads have to update a or get updated a.

critical: all threads execute the code but each one at a time

atomic: memory is protected against multiple writes and is internally replaced by critical

flush: updates shared variables and is implicitly called by critical

Finally, barrier ensures that all threads have reached the same point in code.

I want to exchange further information between this objects, for example an integer (or a more complex object) "a" should be modified during each calculation (though I can not forecast when and how often, but especially mostly more then once).

This statement is a bit irritating, because you should know when you need your updated a. When you do so, you need to have a barrier in all threads, update a in a critical section and continue execution in parallel. So how many threads update a? A master thread or all of them?

If only one thread has to update a, then another option is the single directive. Its code is executed only by one thread with an implicit barrier and implicit flush after execution. These are the general options for proper updating your complex object a to all threads. Good luck.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, from what I've seen so far, an atomic update of the pointer/s seems like it should do the job. If the 'a' is read-only from the calculators, a static pointer could work for all the threads, as long as they make a local copy at their checkpoints and 'old' 'a's are not destroyed. –  Martin James Jan 4 '12 at 11:31

Of course you realize that the method calculate has no access to variable a in the code you posted. If you want to work like this you can write your calculation function inline and use a critical section whenever you are modifying a:

int a;
#pragma omp parallel
{
   #pragma omp for
   for(int i = 0; i < 4; i++)
   {
       // code of calculate
       #pragma omp critical
       {
           // modify a
       }
       // other code
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
In the real code, "a" is accessed via a (callback) pointer in the calculate method. the calculate function is very long, and to a certain extend, not forecastable concerning runtime. Further, the "a" is needed more then once during each calculation, so I can not wait for the whole calculation to pass. So I am not sure if an inline is adequate, there. –  Martin Jan 4 '12 at 10:51
    
@Martin: I was just suggesting to put critical sections wherever you modify a, not to put it at the end of calculate. –  Tudor Jan 4 '12 at 10:57
    
hm reading these comments, you most likely need to add directives within the calculate method to ensure proper updating. –  Bort Jan 4 '12 at 11:02

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