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Question: I need to read a CSV file. I use the FileHelpers library to achieve this.

The problem is I need a dynamic delimiter (user defined), meaning anything can be delimiter (Comma, semicolon, tab, newline, but also anything else).

The problem is, FileHelpers defines the delimiter in an attribute, which means at compile-time. This makes it impossible to do it dynamically.

What I can do is declare a new class, which inherits from one base class, and set the delimiter on this new class.

[FileHelpers.DelimitedRecord(",")]
public class CommaCustomer : BaseCustomer
{

}

That way I only have to make changes in the base class for every new delimiter. The problem is, this is I can't (and don't want to) create a child class for every possible delimiter.

This is the code I have so far:

using System;
using System.Data;
using System.IO;
//using FileHelpers;
//using FileHelpers.RunTime;


namespace Examples
{


    class MainClass
    {


        [STAThread]
        static void Main()
        {
            FileHelpers.FileHelperEngine engine = new FileHelpers.FileHelperEngine(typeof(SemicolonCustomer));

            // To read use:

            string str = @"D:\Username\Desktop\FileHelpers_Examples_CSharp_VbNet\Data\SemicolonCustomers.txt";
            //str = @"D:\Username\Desktop\FileHelpers_Examples_CSharp_VbNet\Data\CustomersDelimited.txt";
            SemicolonCustomer[] custs = (SemicolonCustomer[])engine.ReadFile(str);
            //Customer[] custs = (Customer[]) engine.ReadFile("yourfile.txt");


            foreach (SemicolonCustomer cli in custs)
            {
                Console.WriteLine();
                Console.WriteLine("Customer: " + cli.CustId.ToString() + " - " + cli.Name);
                Console.WriteLine("Added Date: " + cli.AddedDate.ToString("d-M-yyyy"));
                Console.WriteLine("Balance: " + cli.Balance.ToString());
                Console.WriteLine();
                Console.WriteLine("-----------------------------");
            } // Next cli

            Console.ReadKey();
            Console.WriteLine("Writing data to a delimited file...");
            Console.WriteLine();


            // To write use:
            //engine.WriteFile("myyourfile.txt", custs);


            //If you are using .NET 2.0 or greater is 
            //better if you use the Generics version:

            // FileHelperEngine engine = new FileHelperEngine<Customer>();

            // To read use (no casts =)
            // Customer[] custs = engine.ReadFile("yourfile.txt");

            // To write use:
            // engine.WriteFile("yourfile.txt", custs);

        } // End Sub Main


    } // End Class  MainClass


    //------------------------
    //   RECORD CLASS (Example, change at your will)
    //   TIP: Remember to use the wizard to generate this class
    public class BaseCustomer
    {
        public int CustId;

        public string Name;
        public decimal Balance;
        [FileHelpers.FieldConverter(FileHelpers.ConverterKind.Date, "ddMMyyyy")]
        public DateTime AddedDate;
    }


    [FileHelpers.DelimitedRecord(";")]
    public class SemicolonCustomer : BaseCustomer
    {

    }


    [FileHelpers.DelimitedRecord(",")]
    public class CommaCustomer : BaseCustomer
    {

    }


}

Is it somehow possible at runtime to compile a child class

[FileHelpers.DelimitedRecord(\"" + delimiter + "\")]
public class AnyDelimiterCustomer : BaseCustomer
{           
}

And then reference this runtime compiled class in code ?

share|improve this question
    
Attribute parameters must be resolved in compile time. –  Oded Jan 4 '12 at 10:32

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I just realized there is a DelimitedFileEngine which solves your problem another way.

You can just go

var engine = new DelimitedFileEngine(typeof(BaseCustomer));
engine.Options.Delimiter = ",";

It seems that BaseCustomer needs to be decorated with a [DelimitedRecord] attribute, otherwise an exception is raised but the delimiter is overridden by whatever is supplied to engine.Options.Delimiter.

The following example imports a comma delimited record using a format which is marked as bar delimited.

[DelimitedRecord("|")]
public class Format1
{
    public string Field1;           
    public string Field2;            
    public string Field3;            
    public string Field4;
}

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var engine = new DelimitedFileEngine(typeof(Format1));
    // change the delimiter
    engine.Options.Delimiter = ","; 

    // import a comma separated record
    object[] importedObjects = engine.ReadString(@"a,b,c,d");

    foreach (object importedObject in importedObjects)
    {
        if (importedObject is Format1)
        {
            Format1 format1 = (Format1)importedObject;
            // process it (for example, check the values)
            Assert.AreEqual("a", format1.Field1);
            Assert.AreEqual("b", format1.Field2);
            Assert.AreEqual("c", format1.Field3);
            Assert.AreEqual("d", format1.Field4);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent discovery. Very nice ! –  Quandary Aug 26 '12 at 21:08

It is possible. But only by moving the serialization type into a separate assembly.

Like this:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Windows.Forms;


namespace FlaechenupdateScript
{


    static class Program
    {


        // http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cs/runtimecompiling.aspx
        private static System.Reflection.Assembly BuildAssembly(string code)
        {
            Microsoft.CSharp.CSharpCodeProvider provider =
               new Microsoft.CSharp.CSharpCodeProvider();
            System.CodeDom.Compiler.ICodeCompiler compiler = provider.CreateCompiler();
            System.CodeDom.Compiler.CompilerParameters compilerparams = new System.CodeDom.Compiler.CompilerParameters();

            string strLocation = System.Reflection.Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Location;
            string strBasePath = System.IO.Path.GetDirectoryName(strLocation);

            string strSerializationTypes = System.IO.Path.Combine(strBasePath, "SerializationTypes.dll");
            string strFileHelpersLocation = System.IO.Path.Combine(strBasePath, "FileHelpers.dll");

            compilerparams.ReferencedAssemblies.Add(strSerializationTypes);
            compilerparams.ReferencedAssemblies.Add(strFileHelpersLocation);

            compilerparams.GenerateExecutable = false;
            compilerparams.GenerateInMemory = true;
            System.CodeDom.Compiler.CompilerResults results =
               compiler.CompileAssemblyFromSource(compilerparams, code);
            if (results.Errors.HasErrors)
            {
                System.Text.StringBuilder errors = new System.Text.StringBuilder("Compiler Errors :\r\n");
                foreach (System.CodeDom.Compiler.CompilerError error in results.Errors)
                {
                    errors.AppendFormat("Line {0},{1}\t: {2}\n",
                           error.Line, error.Column, error.ErrorText);
                }
                throw new Exception(errors.ToString());
            }
            else
            {
                return results.CompiledAssembly;
            }
        } // End Function BuildAssembly


        public static Type GetClassType(Type tt, string strDelimiter)
        {
            string strFullTypeName = tt.FullName;
            string strTypeUniqueName = System.Guid.NewGuid().ToString() + System.Guid.NewGuid().ToString() + System.Guid.NewGuid().ToString() + System.Guid.NewGuid().ToString();
            strTypeUniqueName = "_" + strTypeUniqueName.Replace("-", "_");

            string xx = @"
            namespace CrapLord
            {

                [FileHelpers.IgnoreFirst]
                [FileHelpers.IgnoreEmptyLines]
                [FileHelpers.DelimitedRecord(""" + strDelimiter + @""")]
                public class " + strTypeUniqueName + @" : " + strFullTypeName + @"
                {

                }

            }

            ";

            System.Reflection.Assembly a = BuildAssembly(xx);

            var o = a.CreateInstance("CrapLord." + strTypeUniqueName);
            Type t = o.GetType();

            //System.Reflection.MethodInfo mi = t.GetMethod("EvalCode");
            //var s = mi.Invoke(o, null);

            return t;
        }


        /// <summary>
        /// Der Haupteinstiegspunkt für die Anwendung.
        /// </summary>
        [STAThread]
        static void Main()
        {
            //Application.EnableVisualStyles();
            //Application.SetCompatibleTextRenderingDefault(false);
            //Application.Run(new Form1());

            Type t = GetClassType(typeof(Tools.Serialization.CSV.Customer), ",");

            //FileHelpers.FileHelperEngine engine = new FileHelpers.FileHelperEngine(typeof(SemicolonCustomer));
            FileHelpers.FileHelperEngine engine = new FileHelpers.FileHelperEngine(t);
            string str = "path/to/datafile";
            Tools.Serialization.CSV.Customer[] custs = (Tools.Serialization.CSV.Customer[])engine.ReadFile(str);
            //Customer[] custs = (Customer[]) engine.ReadFile("yourfile.txt");


            foreach (Tools.Serialization.CSV.Customer cli in custs)
            {
                Console.WriteLine();
                Console.WriteLine("Customer: " + cli.CustId.ToString() + " - " + cli.Name);
                Console.WriteLine("Added Date: " + cli.AddedDate.ToString("d-M-yyyy"));
                Console.WriteLine("Balance: " + cli.Balance.ToString());
                Console.WriteLine();
                Console.WriteLine("-----------------------------");
            } // Next cli



            Console.WriteLine(Environment.NewLine);
            Console.WriteLine(" --- Press any key to continue --- ");
            Console.ReadKey();
        }


    }


}

SerializationTypes Assembly:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Text;


namespace Tools.Serialization.CSV
{

    //------------------------
    //   RECORD CLASS (Example, change at your will)
    //   TIP: Remember to use the wizard to generate this class
    public class Customer
    {
        public int CustId;

        public string Name;
        public decimal Balance;
        [FileHelpers.FieldConverter(FileHelpers.ConverterKind.Date, "ddMMyyyy")]
        public DateTime AddedDate;
    }


}
share|improve this answer
    
Just got further. Now it has problems with thousand separators. And it doesn't work well with properties. –  Quandary Jan 4 '12 at 12:59
    
You seem to be making it way too complicated. Just pass your string xx to ClassBuilder.ClassFromString(xx). –  shamp00 Jan 4 '12 at 17:55
    
@shamp00: No I don't. Putting a return FileHelpers.RunTime.ClassBuilder.ClassFromString(xx); in my GetClassType function will throw a "Namespace not found exception". FYI, I do it like this for that I don't have to define the class as string. I want to define it as an actual class, which is much faster... –  Quandary Jan 6 '12 at 12:17
    
I'm not sure I understand you. The speed improvement would only be with respect to not having to convert the string into a class (once per class). It would have no effect on the performance of the import. Also, you can put using statements in the string you provide to solve any namespace problems. Or alternatively, use the DelimitedClassBuilder. –  shamp00 Jan 6 '12 at 12:51
    
@shamp00: No, the speed improvement is in not having to convert the class into a string when writing the program. Runtime performance is irrelevant (in this case). –  Quandary Jan 24 '12 at 12:12

You can use runtime classes. You have two choices. Either compile your class from a string

For instance

// The class definition 
public string mClass =  
@"  
    [DelimitedRecord(""" + delimiter + @""")]
    public class BaseCustomer
    {
        public int CustId;

        public string Name;
        public decimal Balance;
        [FileHelpers.FieldConverter(FileHelpers.ConverterKind.Date, ""ddMMyyyy"")]
        public DateTime AddedDate;
    }
"; 

Type t = ClassBuilder.ClassFromString(mClass); 

FileHelperEngine engine = new FileHelperEngine(t); 

DataTable = engine.ReadFileAsDT("test.txt"); 

Or alternatively, you can use the DelimitedClassBuilder class.

DelimitedClassBuilder cb = new DelimitedClassBuilder("BaseCustomer", delimiter);

cb.AddField("CustId", typeof(int));
cb.LastField.TrimMode = TrimMode.Both;
cb.LastField.FieldNullValue = 0;
cb.AddField("Balance", typeof(Decimal));
cb.AddField("AddedDate", typeof(DateTime));

engine = new FileHelperEngine(cb.CreateRecordClass());

DataTable dt = engine.ReadFileAsDT("test.txt");
share|improve this answer

No thats not possible.

But you can use the FileHelper DelimitedClassBuilder to build a dynamic file parser where you can set the delimiter at runtime:

DelimitedClassBuilder dcb = new DelimitedClassBuilder("Name", 
                                 "Here goes your col separator");

// You have to build your field definitions by hand now
dcb.AddField("FieldName", typeof(decimal));
...

// build the engine
DelimitedFileEngine fileEngine = new DelimitedFileEngine(dcb.CreateRecordClass());

// read the file
dynamic[] data = fileEngine.ReadFile(filePath);
share|improve this answer
    
This is what I was looking for!! Nice!! –  Taichi Sato Jul 22 '13 at 1:22

Maybe you want to use the TextFieldParser from Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO Namespace:

string[] fields;
string[] delimiter = new string[] { "|" };
using (Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.TextFieldParser parser =
           new Microsoft.VisualBasic.FileIO.TextFieldParser(filename))
{
    parser.Delimiters = delimiter;
    parser.HasFieldsEnclosedInQuotes = false;
    while (!parser.EndOfData)
    {
        fields = parser.ReadFields();

        //Do what you need
    }
}
share|improve this answer

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