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I'm creating a class with string validating methods. I cannot re-assign a value to the object reference like this:

class clearText
{
    private $text;

    function __construct($input)
    {
        $this->text = $input;
    }

    public function clearUp()
    {
        // …
        // functions to sanitize the string in $this->text
        // …
        $this = $this->text;
    }
}

$content = new clearText($_POST['content']);
$content->clearUp();

as the above example outputs:

Fatal error: Cannot re-assign $this in \clearText.php on line 13

When I call clearUp(), I don't need the object anymore, so I would like to avoid specifying this assignment like here, every time I call the method:

$content = new clearText($_POST['content']);
$content->clearUp();
$content = $content->text;

Is there any way to do this inside the method?


A possible answer

Somebody suggested returning the value, so I can re-assign it to the object variable in the same statement, that execute the method. The answer has since been deleted, but it works for what I need.

Method definiton:

public function clearUp()
{
    // …
    // functions to sanitize the string in $this->text
    // …
    return $this->text;
}

When instantiated:

$content = new clearText($_POST['content']);
$content = $content->clearUp();
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2  
It would not make sense that an object can transform itself into a primitive data type. However, you could override the __toString method of the class. –  Felix Kling Jan 4 '12 at 10:31
3  
I must admit that I have no clue why you even tried to modify $this object reference. If you don't need the object, use a static class with static methods. –  N.B. Jan 4 '12 at 10:31
    
Of course I do more with the object than just calling one method. Still I might have overrated the idea of keeping to only functional or object-oriented code in one project. –  Gergő Jan 4 '12 at 12:12
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2 Answers

Instead of calling the clearUp() method, call unset(). Assign the string to another variable before though. However, this will also ensure that any memory used by the clearText object is released:

$content = new clearText($_POST['content']);
$content = $content->text;
share|improve this answer
    
clearUp() has several functions (for filtering the string in $text) that I noted in the comment. (I will make it more clear in the question.) I only want to include the re-assignment of the holding variable. –  Gergő Jan 4 '12 at 11:20
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No. $this is the actually instance of the class that you're dealing with. You can't set it to any other value ever. It's a 'magic' keyword if you will.

Much like how you can't set the word private to mean something else.

You can destroy your instance by deleting $content however.

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