Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

When opening a coredump with gdb, will gdb try to load the full coredump into memory?

I've found a coredump with a size of 35Gb on one of our staging systems. Our operating instructions call for the creation of a backtrace using gdb. I'm afraid gdb will try to load the full coredump into memory and render the staging area unusable by using up all available memory.

We're using gdb 7.0.1 on a RedHat EL 5 / 64bit installation.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

When opening a coredump with gdb, will gdb try to load the full coredump into memory?

No.

I'm afraid gdb will try to load the full coredump into memory and render the staging area unusable by using up all available memory.

Even without loading the entire core dump, GDB will consume some memory, so you may have an effect on your staging system. If you can't afford to have an effect, then you need to modify your "operating procedures", e.g. move the core to a different system and analyze it there. Beware: if your executable uses dynamic linking, you must arrange for the dynamic libraries to match exactly at the time when core dump was generated and when it is analyzed.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there a way to estimate how much memory gdb will consume? Running gdb with coredumps up to 4Gb has never been a problem in this environment. Unfortunately I've never bothered to check how much memory was used. – briconaut Jan 4 '12 at 16:30
    
"Beware: if your executable uses dynamic linking, you must arrange for the dynamic libraries to match exactly at the time when core dump was generated and when it is analyzed." what happens if they aren't? Will the backtrace, at least, be present? – bruce.banner Jan 5 '12 at 21:36
1  
"what happens if they aren't?" It depends. If you don't catch the signal (e.g. to print a message), and the crash happens not in the system library, they you likely will get a stack trace. Otherwise, you likely will get a truncated stack trace, or just garbage. – Employed Russian Jan 6 '12 at 1:31

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.