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I'm painfully aware there probably isn't a magic bullet to this, but it's becoming a problem. Each user has hundreds of thousands of rows of metrics data across 3 tables, this is updated on a second by second basis.

When a user logs in, I want to quickly deliver them top line stats for a number of their assets (i.e. alongside each asset in navi they have top level stats).

I've tried a number of ideas; but please - if someone has some advice or experience in this area it'd be great. Stuff tried or looked into so far:-

  • Produce static versions of top line stats every hour or so - This is intensive across all users and all assets. So how this can be done regularly, I'm not sure.
  • Call stats via AJAX, so they can be processed and fill in (getting top level stats right now can take up to 10 seconds for a larger user) once page has loaded. This could also cache stats in session to save redoing queries each page load.
  • Query run at 30 min intervals, i.e. you log on, it'll query and then it'll hopefully use query cache every time it's loaded (only 1/2 seconds) until the next 30min interval.

The first one seems to have most legs, but I'm not sure how to do this, given only a small number of users will be needing those stats - it seems awfully expensive to do it for everyone all the time.

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Hundreds of thousands of rows isn't that much. A few million isn't that much. This sounds like a case where you require optimization on the database level. What's the hardware you're using to run your MySQL instance, what database engine are you using (MyISAM, InnoDB or something else), what's the exact number of rows we're talking about, how many records / second are you adding to your db and how many people are using your db for reading? –  N.B. Jan 4 '12 at 11:16
    
A user has access to several 'other users' projects at any time, so this is where the extra query level comes in... joining 3 tables together. I'm running MyISAM on a small RDS instance (with nothing else on it, this is duplication on a live large instance. –  waxical Jan 4 '12 at 11:18
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Yep, I had a hunch you were using MyISAM. Difference between two engines (MyISAM and InnoDB) is that InnoDB is significantly faster for certain purposes. One of the benefits of InnoDB is that it tries to store entire working data-set in the RAM (controlled by innodb_buffer_poool MySQL variable). The other thing is that InnoDB tries to save the data on the disk in a different manner to MyISAM so sequential reads are faster. It might be an idea swapping the storage engine and increasing the memory buffer, 2 gigs should suffice. –  N.B. Jan 4 '12 at 11:21
    
I've tried this now, and it's faster... half the time... but not sufficient to make it useable for users. I may have to cut out the joining elements (thereby limited data at this level) as this is the only thing to make dramatic cuts. –  waxical Jan 4 '12 at 11:28
    
Have you inspected the queries you're doing by adding EXPLAIN before SELECT? It's probably a case of sub-optimal queries that are causing too much I/O. –  N.B. Jan 4 '12 at 11:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. Produce static versions of top line stats every hour or so - This is intensive across all users and all assets. So how this can be done
    regularly, I'm not sure.
  2. Call stats via AJAX, so they can be processed and fill in (getting top level stats right now can take up to 10 seconds for a larger user) once page has loaded. This could also cache stats in session to save redoing queries each page load.
  3. Query run at 30 min intervals, i.e. you log on, it'll query and then it'll hopefully use query cache every time it's loaded (only 1/2 seconds) until the next 30min interval.

Your option 1 and 3 in mySQL is known as a materialized view MySQL doesn't currently support them but the concept can be completed link provides examples

hundreds of thousands of records isn't that much. good indexes and the use of analytic queries will get you quite far. Sadly this concept isn't implemented in full but there are workarounds as well as indicated in the link provided.

It really depends on top line stats. are you wanting real time data down to the second or are 10-20 or even 30 minute intervals acceptable? Using event scheduler one can schedule the creation/update of reporting table(s) which contain summarized data faster to query. This data then is available at fractions of seconds delivery time as all the heavy lifting has already been completed. Your focus can then be on indexing these tables to improve performance without worrying about impacts to production tables.

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The event scheduler is subject to my concerns in the fact that it's the fetching the data that takes the time, so I'd need to fetch and insert as 'new data', so select 14,000 interaction rows and put in a new row just as 14000. This takes time for MySQL to process for each user and I'm concerned the box will be doing this all day long every day and draining resources. –  waxical Jan 4 '12 at 11:37
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Without knowing the type of heavy lifting this may be doing you could very well be right. In most cases I've run into the use of mySQL attempt at some analytic functions (roll up) have increased performance. Each query/report would need to be evaluated on a case by case bases for attempting to implement SQL with an OPTIMAL design AND execution plan. As you pointed out there is no silver bullet. –  xQbert Jan 4 '12 at 11:53

You are in the datawarehousing domain with your setup. This means, that not all the NF1 rules apply. So my approach would be to use triggers to fill a seperate stats table.

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