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Formulated in another way,

could you give an example assignment of JAVA, x=y, such that the declared type of "x" is not a supertype of that of "y"?

Recall that the declared type is "T" if x is declared as "T x". (supertype includes "the same type" by convention.)

Thanks.

[Edit]

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Plz tell the reason of the -1 –  zell Jan 4 '12 at 11:37
    
is this homework? –  oers Jan 4 '12 at 11:42
    
honestly, no. Maybe it's my way to formulate the problem like this if you like. –  zell Jan 4 '12 at 11:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In assignment the LHS must be the type or the RHS or a super type. With supertype also covariant array types are meant: String[] to Object[] (never use that!). Or widening (primitive types) may take place: assigning an int to a float. Or boxing may happen: Integer to int, int to Integer.

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The answer is no, according to the Java language specification, below. See the bold text.

Assignment of a value of compile-time reference type S (source) to a variable of compile-time reference type T (target) is checked as follows:

If S is a class type:

  • If T is a class type, then S must either be the same class as T, or S must be a subclass of T, or a compile-time error occurs.
  • If T is an interface type, then S must implement interface T, or a compile-time error occurs.
  • If T is an array type, then a compile-time error occurs.

If S is an interface type:

  • If T is a class type, then T must be Object, or a compile-time error occurs.
  • If T is an interface type, then T must be either the same interface as S or a superinterface of S, or a compile-time error occurs.
  • If T is an array type, then a compile-time error occurs.

If S is an array type SC[], that is, an array of components of type SC:

  • If T is a class type, then T must be Object, or a compile-time error occurs.
  • If T is an interface type, then a compile-time error occurs unless T is the type java.io.Serializable or the type Cloneable, the only interfaces implemented by arrays.
  • If T is an array type TC[], that is, an array of components of type TC, then a compile-time error occurs unless one of the following is true:

    • TC and SC are the same primitive type.
    • TC and SC are both reference types and type SC is assignable to TC, as determined by a recursive application of these compile-time rules for assignability.
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I may misunderstand something. The bold part gives a positive answer to the question I think? –  zell Jan 4 '12 at 12:06
    
It means: for T x = S y to work, the type of y must be the type of x or a subtype. Or, in another words, the type of x must be a supertype of the type of y. –  Thiago Chaves Jan 4 '12 at 12:13

Well, depends on what you mean by "supertype". However, if used as a general OOP term: Object[] arr = new Integer[5];

For discussion on why this is a flaw of the type system, please see for example http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?JavaArraysBreakTypeSafety

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Certainly:

Object o = new Object();
Object o2 = o;

In this example, the type of o2 is not a proper supertype of the type of o. However as far as the intention of the question (probably) goes, see the accepted answer.

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1  
Sorry, supertype includes "the same type" by convention. –  zell Jan 4 '12 at 11:51
    
Sorry, you didn't mention in your question whether you were referring to proper supertypes or not. –  afrischke Jan 4 '12 at 12:14

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