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I have an example where I want an abstract class interface to return something like this

abstract class AnimalProcessor {
    public abstract IList<Animal> ProcessResults();
}

Then the concrete examples

class GiraffeProcessor : AnimalProcessor {
    public override IList<Animal> ProcessResults() {
        return new List<Giraffe>();
    }
}

class LionProcessor : AnimalProcessor {
    public override IList<Animal> ProcessResults() {
        return new List<Lion>();
    }
}

The problem is that the concrete classes need to have the same signature to override the ProcessResults() method so they need to return an IList<Animal>, however the ACTUAL data I want to return is an IList<Lion>, IList<Giraffe> etc, but then the calling code has to do

GiraffeProcessor processor = new GiraffeProcessor();
IList<Animal> results = processor.GetResults();

Which does not give me an Ilist which is what I want.

Problems

1) Above code does not compile. The giraffeProcessor has to return a concrete List<Animal>, you can populate it with Giraffe objects but the object type you construct to return has to be List<Animal>. Not ideal.

2) When you return the results, you can only get an IList<Animal>, not IList<Giraffe>. I have tried casting explicitly to IList<Giraffe> with IList<Giraffe> results = (IList<Giraffe>) processor.GetResults(); which gives a runtime error, presumably because the object returned is NOT an IList<Giraffe>, it is an IList<Animal> which CONTAINS Giraffe objects.

Can anyone suggest what I am doing wrong here with my design as Im a bit stumped as to the best way to accomplish this.

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1  
What purpose does having a blank IList serve that having a typed IList doesn't serve? –  Joel Etherton Jan 4 '12 at 11:39

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

How about:

abstract class AnimalProcessor<T> where T : Animal {
    public abstract IList<T> ProcessResults();
}

class GiraffeProcessor : AnimalProcessor<Giraffe> {
    public override IList<Giraffe> ProcessResults() {
        return new List<Giraffe>();
    }
}

class LionProcessor : AnimalProcessor<Lion> {
    public override IList<Lion> ProcessResults() {
        return new List<Lion>();
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect! Just the solution I was looking for, wasn't aware of the declaration of Inherited parent classes passing in a generic type like that. Thanks very much –  NZJames Jan 4 '12 at 14:58

You could resolve this by declaring AnimalProcessor with a generic type constraint, e.g.

public abstract class AnimalProcessor<T> where T : Animal 
{    
    public abstract IList<T> ProcessResults(); 
} 

If that doesnt work, you could use the LINQ Cast operator, for example:

public class GiraffeProcessor : AnimalProcessor 
{     
    public override IList<Animal> ProcessResults() 
    {         
        return new List<Giraffe>().Cast<Animal>();
    } 
}

Or, store the list internally as Animal but add Giraffe's to it, e.g.

public class GiraffeProcessor : AnimalProcessor 
{     
    private List<Giraffe> _innerList = new List<Giraffe>();
    public override IList<Animal> ProcessResults() 
    {         
        return new List<Animal>(innerList );        } 
}

Best regards,

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1  
The standard Cast<T>() method will return an IEnumerable<T>, not an IList<T> –  Marc Gravell Jan 4 '12 at 11:48
    
Yes, very true. calling .Cast<T>().ToList() isn't very efficient. I'd favour generic typed base class first, or second storing the innerlist as a different type. Regards, –  Dr. ABT Jan 4 '12 at 13:36

If you are using C# 4.0, you can ask yourself whether the processor should return IEnumerable<T> rather than IList<T>. If the answer is "yes", then you can profit from covariance:

abstract class AnimalProcessor { 
    public abstract IEnumerable<Animal> ProcessResults(); 
} 

class GiraffeProcessor : AnimalProcessor { 
    public override IEnumerable<Animal> ProcessResults() { 
        return new List<Giraffe>(); 
    } 
} 

class LionProcessor : AnimalProcessor { 
    public override IEnumerable<Animal> ProcessResults() { 
        return new List<Lion>(); 
    } 
} 

You have a couple of advantages here. First, you could implement these as iterator blocks:

class GiraffeProcessor : AnimalProcessor { 
    public override IEnumerable<Animal> ProcessResults() { 
        yield break;
    } 
} 

Second, and less trivially, you allow the client code to decide what kind of collection to dump the animals into -- if any. For example, consider that the consumer might want a LinkedList<Animal>:

var animals = new LinkedList<Animal>(animalProcessor.ProcessResults());

Or consider that the client might need only to iterate the sequence:

foreach (var animal in animalProcessor.ProcessResults())
    { /*... do something ...*/ }

In either case, if you were using a ToList() call in ProcessResults, you'd be creating a list for nothing. If the consumer really wants a List<Animal>, that can be accomplished very easily:

var animals = new List<Animal>(animalProcessor.ProcessResults());

Finally, you can also benefit from the generic approach, even if you change the interface type of the method's return value:

abstract class AnimalProcessor<T> where T : Animal { 
    public abstract IEnumerable<T> ProcessResults(); 
} 

class GiraffeProcessor : AnimalProcessor<Giraffe> { 
    public override IEnumerable<Giraffe> ProcessResults() { 
        yield break;
    } 
} 

class LionProcessor : AnimalProcessor<Lion> { 
    public override IEnumerable<Lion> ProcessResults() { 
        return Enumerable.Empty<Lion>();
    } 
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Just a question on Lists, I quite like using the List<>.ForEach(a => action()) approach but it seems every time I get an IEnumerable I have to first do .ToList<T>() before doing the .ForEach(). Am I using this wrong? –  NZJames Jan 5 '12 at 13:47
    
Yes. Your ToList() call allocates an array and copies all the items to it, unneccessarily. You could trivially implement your own extension method to allow this syntax on IEnumerable<T>, but, as Eric Lippert has written, it's philosophically questionable. See blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2009/05/18/…. (And in a response to a comment on that post, he notes that he is also philosophically troubled by List<T>.ForEach().) –  phoog Jan 5 '12 at 14:58

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