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I am currently working on a program that read each line from a file and extract the word from the line using specific delimiter.

So basically my code looks like this

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main(int argv, char **argc)
{
  ifstream fin(argc[1]);
  char delimiter[] = "|,.\n ";
  string sentence;

  while (getline(fin,sentence)) {
     int pos;
     pos = sentence.find_first_of(delimiter);
     while (pos != string::npos) {
        if (pos > 0) {
           cout << sentence.substr(0,pos) << endl;
        }
          sentence =sentence.substr(pos+1);
          pos = sentence.find_first_of(delimiter);
      }
  }
}

However my code didnot read the last word in the line. For example, my file looks like this. hello world

the output from the program is only the word "hello" but not "world" . I have use '\n' as the delimiter but why didnot it works?.

Any hint would be appreciated.

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This sounds like a class assignment. –  Jack B Nimble May 16 '09 at 15:47
    
Obviously not the real code - where is the definition of "sentence". –  anon May 16 '09 at 15:50
    
I fixed this, but in the future please post code that works as described. What you had originally posted didn't even compile. It will save us some time and get you a faster answer if you post working code that illustrates the bug you're talking about. –  Bill the Lizard May 16 '09 at 16:06
    
Thanks , I now what I did wrong now. Thanks for the help –  chris May 24 '09 at 0:46
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3 Answers

getline does not save the new line character in the string. For example, if your file has the line "Hello World\n" getline will read this string "Hello World\0" So your code misses the "World".

Igonoring that sentence is not defined, you could alter your code to work like this:

#include<iostream>
#include<fstream>
using namespace std;

int main(int argv, char *argc)
{
  ifstream fin(argc[1]);
  char delimiter[]="|,.\n ";
  while (getline(fin,sentence)) {
     sentence += "\n";
     int pos;   
     pos = find_first_of(sentence,delimiter);
     while (pos != string:: npos) {
        if (pos > 0) {
           cout << sentence.substr(0,pos) << "\n";
        }
          sentence =sentence.substr(pos+1);
          pos = find_first_of(sentence,delimiter);
      }
  }
}

Note, I borrowed Bill the Lizards more elegant solution of appending the last delimiter. My previous version had a loop exit condition.

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Paraphrasing this reference document:

Characters are extracted until the delimiting character (\n) is found, discarded and the remaining characters returned.

Your string doesn't end with an \n, it is ^`hello world`$, so no delimiter or new pos is found.

share|improve this answer
    
is there any other delimiter that could be used to identified end of line in this case? –  chris May 16 '09 at 16:13
    
or could I use code other then getline to read the \n? if there is one then what is it? –  chris May 16 '09 at 16:14
    
I guess you missed this from the article; 'If you don't want this character to be extracted, you can use member "get" instead.' –  garrow May 17 '09 at 0:56
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As others have mentioned, getline doesn't return the newline character at the end. The simplest way to fix your code is to append one to the end of the sentence after the getline call.

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main(int argv, char **argc)
{
  ifstream fin(argc[1]);
  char delimiter[] = "|,.\n ";
  string sentence;

  while (getline(fin,sentence)) {
     sentence += "\n";
     int pos;
     pos = sentence.find_first_of(delimiter);
     while (pos != string::npos) {
        if (pos > 0) {
           cout << sentence.substr(0,pos) << endl;
        }
          sentence =sentence.substr(pos+1);
          pos = sentence.find_first_of(delimiter);
      }
  }
}
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