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The W3C maintain a page of advice on how to size your fonts in CSS - last updated in April 2010. According to this page the very best way to style fonts is to use the "absolute" font-sizes:

even better, if a base font-size is set for the document, use absolute size ([ xx-small | x-small | small | medium | large | x-large | xx-large ]) or relative size ([ larger | smaller ]) when defining the font size for a particular element within the document.

The spec then defines these font-sizes in a table. As far as I understand this table, small should be 2/3 (66%) the size of medium, and large should be 4/3 (133%).

If I test this out I get rather different results from my interpretation of the ratios specified by the W3C. The results are consistent across latest versions of Chrome, Firefox and IE, but do not tally up with the W3C recommendation. small is 81.25% instead of 66%, and large is 112.5% instead of 133%.

Does this mean that modern browsers are not supporting these standards from the W3C? Is there a new standard that superseded this one that I'm not aware of? Or have I misunderstood the meaning of that table from the W3C?

At the end of the day my question comes down to: Is it still the best practice to use absolute font sizes in CSS? Will it behave consistently across browsers? And ideally I would like to know what standard the modern browsers are following.

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I believe the best way to go is to use relative font-sizes: em and percentages. Note that html also as a <small> tag which makes everything somewhat more confusing, the only benefit according to the html5 spec is that this could be useful semantically. But i wonder what others have to stay about the css styles x-large as well! –  c4urself Jan 4 '12 at 12:32
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You misinterpret the table you link to. Medium is HTML font size 3, small is HTML font size 2, referring to the deprecated font tag and its 1..7 font sizes.

Anyway, if you want to honor the user's font size preferences, don't use font sizes such as 10px and the like. Medium means the user's preference. (Although the vast majority of users leave their preferred size on the factory default, because they don't know how to change it.)

@MrLister said in comments:

[ratio between absolute font sizes] differs between browsers .. . According to the W3C, it may even differ between fonts. In my personal experience, in some browsers there is also a difference between strict and quirks mode. So if you want consistency, don't use it. Establish a size for the body (either the size you want, or leave it up to the user) and then work with percentages or ems for the various elements

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And in fact in addition to the table misinterpretation that page specifically says that the table is calculated differently by different UAs and even for different fonts... –  Chris Jan 4 '12 at 12:39
    
Ah good! Yes I couldn't work out what it meant by "HTML font sizes". Are they defined somewhere? Or if they're not, and specifically left up to the UA (as @Chris points out) is there a reliable table of browser defaults? Only because if I need to code some CSS based on a style guide or a design PNG I need to know what sizes I'm dealing with. –  Robin Winslow Jan 4 '12 at 12:45
    
Just to add - I get that they're likely to change, and so if I want specific font pixel sizes I shouldn't be relying on small, medium etc. But I would like to code according to best practice (and such that font sizes could change and the site still be usable) but still have it look to the stakeholders like the specified design. –  Robin Winslow Jan 4 '12 at 12:47
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It differes between browsers, yes. According to the W3C, it may even differ between fonts. In my personal experience, in some browsers there is also a difference between strict and quirks mode. So if you want consistency, don't use it. Establish a size for the body (either the size you want, or leave it up to the user) and then work with percentages or ems for the various elements. –  Mr Lister Jan 4 '12 at 12:49
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"Medium" translates to 1em.

As a base font size for a document, 1em (or 100%) is equivalent to setting the font size to the user's preference.

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No no no, 1em is not the same as medium. 1em means "the same font size as the parent". If <body> does not have a font size specified, THEN 1em is the same as medium in the body. In a h1 for instance, 1em means the same size as the h1, while medium would be the user's default preference. –  Mr Lister Jan 4 '12 at 12:42
    
I think you misunderstood my question. This particular fact, while usually true, was not the point. –  Robin Winslow Jan 4 '12 at 12:42
    
"Is it still the best practice to use absolute font sizes in CSS?" - absolute as in "10pt" or absolute as in "small" ("small" refering to the font tag's values for size). What I was trying to say is that the former font tag size "medium" will translate to 1em base font size, i.e. it is bound to be browserspecific, yet should be regarded as "medium". As far as best practice goes, defining your base font size as 1em and defering from that for all other elements would be my personal vote - not sure if you'd like to call that "absolute" or "relative" then. –  kontur Jan 4 '12 at 12:55
    
@kontur: I think medium is absolute in that it is not dependant on what the font size of the containing block is. 1em however is dependant on the surrounding font size. so if you have a block with font-size set to 50px then 1em will be 50px whereas medium will be whatever the browser default size it is (probably not 50px). See jsfiddle.net/chrisvenus/NxBA5/2 for an example that clearly demonstrates that medium and 1em are not the same thing. –  Chris Jan 4 '12 at 14:46
    
right, chris, thanks for clearing that up. 1 em of course always is relative to it's container's font-size :) –  kontur Jan 4 '12 at 19:17
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