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Using only stdio.h, string.h and stdlib.h libraries how would I go about implementing this?

I'm quite new to programming so please bear with me!

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7  
What about you tried so far? –  Shamim Hafiz Jan 4 '12 at 13:12
    
is it your homework? –  Renan Greinert Jan 4 '12 at 13:14
    
@RenanGreinert: the question was tagged homework by the OP. –  larsmans Jan 4 '12 at 13:16
    
<stdio.h>, <string.h>, &c are not libraries. They are (standard) headers which provide (among possibly other things) prototypes for functions present in a library (probably libc). –  pmg Jan 4 '12 at 13:20

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
  1. Allocate a new char array of the same length as your string. Convince yourself that this is enough space. Don't forget the NUL.
  2. Loop through the string, copying to the new string only those characters that are alphanumeric. You can't do this portably without also including <ctype.h> and using a function/macro from that header, unless you're going to enumerate all characters that you consider alphanumeric.
  3. Again, don't forget the NUL.
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Why wouldn't it be sufficient to just check that each character is in a certain range of the ascii table to ensure it's alphanumeric? –  rzetterberg Jan 4 '12 at 13:18
    
@rzetterberg: I said portable. What is considered alphanumeric differs per character encoding/locale and <ctype.h>'s functions are sensitive to this. –  larsmans Jan 4 '12 at 13:20
    
I'm asking because I want to know, I'm not questioning you. Thanks for clarifying why. I'm Swedish and should know that äöå is not part of ascii :P –  rzetterberg Jan 4 '12 at 13:21
    
@rzetterberg: sorry for sounding pedantic. –  larsmans Jan 4 '12 at 13:22

Since this is homework, here is the verbal description:

Run a loop over the original string and use the functions isalnum() to determine if a character is alphanumeric. Maintain a second char array of reasonable size and every time you encounter an AlphaNum, insert it to that array. Once all AlphaNum characters have been copied to the second array, NULL terminate it and you have your string.

Note: isalnum() is defined in ctype.h, so if you aren't allowed to use that, you may have to define this function for yourself. That is another exercise of it's own.

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Every char you read in your string is a byte (you can think it as a number between 0 and 255, and that's how the computers handle them) so you just need to check the ascii table to see what letter refers to.

Every alphanumerical char is in this range: [48, 58] (for numbers), or [65, 90] (upper case), or [97, 122] (lower case).

Look at this:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

#define SIZE    64

int isalphanum(char);    /*states if a char is alphanumerical or not*/
char *getalphanum(char *, char*);    /*modifies the second string to get the result*/

int main(void) {
    char in[SIZE] = "Hello, W@#@#@#@#@#orl...,.,d!";    /*just a random to try out*/
    char out[SIZE];
    getalphanum(in, out);
    printf("%s", out);
    return 0;
}

int isalphanum(char a) {
    if ((a >= 48) && (a <= 58))
        return 1;
    if ((a >= 65) && (a <= 90))
        return 1;
    if ((a >= 97) && (a <= 122))
        return 1;
    return 0;
}

char *getalphanum(char *s, char *t) {
    if ((s == NULL) || (t == NULL))    /*tests if the strings are "handble"*/
        return NULL;
    int i = 0;
    int j = 0;
    char c;
    while ((c = *(s + i)) != '\0') {
    if (isalphanum(c)){
        *(t + j) = c;
        j++;
    }  
    i++;
    }
    *(t + j) = '\0';
    return t;
}

This code works and is very simple and can be improved, but there is evertything you need.

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1  
Be careful about assuming ASCII representation, as mentioned above. –  prelic Jan 4 '12 at 21:05
1  
Right! Anyway for someone new to programming it could be a good point to start from. –  Kraw Jan 5 '12 at 7:01

The best way is to use the isalnum() from ctype.h but now that is not an option, I have written a not-standard/non-portable function called isalnum_not_prefered() which is the equivalent of ctype.h's isalnum().

#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int isalnum_not_prefered(char s) 
{
    if((s >= 'A' && s <= 'Z') || 
       (s >= 'a' && s <= 'z') || 
       (s >= '0' && s <= '9')) 
        return 1;
    return 0;
}

int main(void)
{
    char str[] = "this!234$#&@#$^is5@#$a#@$4677~=_?}valid2234kjstring";
    int len = strlen(str);
    int i, j=0;

    char *newstr1 = NULL;
    char *newstr2 = NULL;

    if ((newstr1 = (char *) malloc(sizeof(char) * len + 1)) == NULL) {
        printf("unable to allocate memory \n");
        return -1;
    }

    for (i=0 ; i<len ; i++) {
        if (isalnum(str[i])) {
            newstr1[j] = str[i];
            j++;
        }
    }
    newstr1[j] = '\0';

    if ((newstr2 = (char *) malloc(sizeof(char) * len + 1)) == NULL) {
        printf("unable to allocate memory \n");
        return -1;
    }

    j=0;
    for (i=0 ; i<len ; i++) {
        if (isalnum_not_prefered(str[i])) {
            newstr2[j] = str[i];
            j++;
        }
    }
    newstr2[j] = '\0';

    printf("string  : %s \n", str);
    printf("result1 : %s \n", newstr1);
    printf("result2 : %s \n", newstr2);

    free(newstr1);
    free(newstr2);

    return 0;
}

Points to note:

  1. strings in C is terminated with \0. So the new string that your are populating should also terminate with \0
  2. malloc()'ed memory must be free()'ed
  3. malloc() errors should be handled
  4. this code is not portable as it assumes the machines character set to be ASCII. If the hardware supports some other character set (say EBCDIC) then this may not work as expected.

Hope this helps!

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@meiryo If you find my answer useful, please feel free to up and click the tick mark next to it. Thanks! –  Sangeeth Saravanaraj Jan 5 '12 at 16:30

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