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>>> s = 'auszuschließen'
>>> print(s.encode('ascii', errors='xmlcharrefreplace'))
b'auszuschließen'
>>> print(str(s.encode('ascii', errors='xmlcharrefreplace'), 'ascii'))
auszuschließen

Is there a prettier way to print any string without the b''?

EDIT:

I'm just trying to print escaped characters from Python, and my only gripe is that Python adds "b''" when i do that.

If i wanted to see the actual character in a dumb terminal like Windows 7's, then i get this:

Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "Mailgen.py", line 378, in <module>
    marked_copy = mark_markup(language_column, item_row)
  File "Mailgen.py", line 210, in mark_markup
    print("TP: %r" % "".join(to_print))
  File "c:\python32\lib\encodings\cp437.py", line 19, in encode
    return codecs.charmap_encode(input,self.errors,encoding_map)[0]
UnicodeEncodeError: 'charmap' codec can't encode character '\u2026' in position 29: character maps to <undefined>
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1  
why aren't you just using print(s)? Why do you need to encode as ascii? –  jcollado Jan 4 '12 at 13:17
    
Because i don't think my terminal supports every weird character my code processes. –  Cees Timmerman Jan 4 '12 at 13:46
1  
print(str(s.encode('ascii', errors='ignore'), 'ascii')) will be even prettier, anyway. –  Lennart Regebro Jan 4 '12 at 17:06
1  
I've update my answer. Although that answers your question, it has the feeling of actually solving the wrong problem. The question that pops up in my mind is why you want to have a "pretty" output of what essentially is debug information (the Unicode characters in a string). Is this logging, the actual program user interface or stdout output that should be fed to another program, or...? –  Lennart Regebro Jan 4 '12 at 18:56
2  
You could also set environment variable PYTHONIOENCODING=cp437:backslashreplace and then use print(s). I didn't mentioned it in the answer because python might crash if you set it incorrectly. –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 5 '12 at 0:20
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted
>>> s='auszuschließen…'
>>> s
'auszuschließen…'
>>> print(s)
auszuschließen…
>>> b=s.encode('ascii','xmlcharrefreplace')
>>> b
b'auszuschlie&#223;en&#8230;'
>>> print(b)
b'auszuschlie&#223;en&#8230;'
>>> b.decode()
'auszuschlie&#223;en&#8230;'
>>> print(b.decode())
auszuschlie&#223;en&#8230;

You start out with a Unicode string. Encoding it to ascii creates a bytes object with the characters you want. Python won't print it without converting it back into a string and the default conversion puts in the b and quotes. Using decode explicitly converts it back to a string; the default encoding is utf-8, and since your bytes only consist of ascii which is a subset of utf-8 it is guaranteed to work.

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This is the most elegant solution so far. Note that my terminal silently turns '…' into '.' –  Cees Timmerman Jan 5 '12 at 1:46
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To see ascii representation (like repr() on Python 2) for debugging:

print(ascii('auszuschließen…'))
# -> 'auszuschlie\xdfen\u2026'

To print bytes:

sys.stdout.buffer.write('auszuschließen…'.encode('ascii', 'xmlcharrefreplace'))
# -> auszuschlie&#223;en&#8230;
share|improve this answer
    
print(ascii()) does get rid of the b, but not the quotes... –  Lennart Regebro Jan 4 '12 at 23:50
    
@Lennart Regebro: correct. # -> shows that. –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 5 '12 at 0:20
    
On closer inspection, in my terminal sys.stdout.buffer.write('auszuschließen…test'.encode('ascii', 'xmlcharrefreplace')) prints: auszuschlie&#223;en.test24 I don't like special cases (uncaught return value gets printed), so i'll go with the decode() solution. –  Cees Timmerman Jan 5 '12 at 1:44
1  
@Cees Timmerman: no, it is not. You might be confusing it with an interactive interpreter such as ipython, bpython, idle or just bare python without arguments. In this case you don't need to print the string; the interpreter echos its value by itself. –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 5 '12 at 2:00
1  
@J.F.Sebastian: Yes. The point is that he wanted to print without the b''. Using ascii only prints without the b, but keeps the ''. –  Lennart Regebro Jan 5 '12 at 7:06
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Not all terminals can handle more than some sort of 8-bit character set, that's true. But they won't handle that no matter what you do, really.

Printing a Unicode string will, assuming that your OS set's up the terminal properly, result in the best result possible, which means that the characters that the terminal can not print will be replaced with some character, like a question mark or similar. Doing that translation yourself will not really improve things.

Update:

Since you want to know what characters are in the string, you actually want to know the Unicode codes for them, or the XML equivalent in this case. That's more inspecting than printing, and then usually the b'' part isn't a problem per se.

But you can get rid of it easily and hackily like so:

print(repr(s.encode('ascii', errors='xmlcharrefreplace'))[2:-1])
share|improve this answer
    
Traceback (most recent call last): File "Mailgen.py", line 378, in <module> marked_copy = mark_markup(language_column, item_row) File "Mailgen.py", line 210, in mark_markup print("TP: %r" % "".join(to_print)) File "c:\python32\lib\encodings\cp437.py", line 19, in encode return codecs.charmap_encode(input,self.errors,encoding_map)[0] UnicodeEncodeError: 'charmap' codec can't encode character '\u2026' in position 29: character maps to <undefined> –  Cees Timmerman Jan 4 '12 at 16:47
    
@CeesTimmerman: See, there you have the start of an actual question. You should make one. Also include information about your terminal. –  Lennart Regebro Jan 4 '12 at 16:54
    
Okay: How do i Pythonically print an unknown Unicode string in the 64-bit Windows 7 Enterprise Command terminal (and preferably any other terminal as well)? –  Cees Timmerman Jan 4 '12 at 16:57
    
@CeesTimmerman You should update your original question with the details that you've specified in your first comment (or ask a new question if it's completely different from this one); this will improve the question and give more people the opportunity to help you. –  casperOne Jan 4 '12 at 17:41
1  
@CeesTimmerman Stop asking additional questions in comments. Update your main question with the details if it doesn't change the nature of the question. –  casperOne Jan 4 '12 at 17:53
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Since you're using Python 3, you're afforded the ability to write print(s) to the console.

I can agree that, depending on the console, it may not be able to print properly, but I would imagine that most modern OSes since 2006 can handle Unicode strings without too much of an issue. I'd encourage you to give it a try and see if it works.

Alternatively, you can enforce a coding by placing this before any lines in a file (similar to a shebang):

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-

This will force the interpreter to render it as UTF-8.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I'm already using that. –  Cees Timmerman Jan 4 '12 at 16:51
    
This copy of 64-bit Windows 7 Enterprise Command terminal, for one, does not like to print characters not in CP437, e.g. '\u2026'. –  Cees Timmerman Jan 4 '12 at 17:31
1  
1. # -*- coding: utf-8 -*- is default on Python3 2. It doesn't change how print(s) works. It only affects how literal strings are interpreted. –  J.F. Sebastian Jan 4 '12 at 20:22
    
I just looked into it and you're right @J.F.Sebastian. –  Makoto Jan 4 '12 at 20:24
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