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the code below is unable to find a matching record when it "should":

$result = mysql_query("SELECT * FROM $tbl_Name WHERE userID = '$userID' AND userKey = password('$user_password')");  // where $user_password = god12345 for example

userID comparison works fine if I remove the AND....
password comparison fails above. I am certain that when the user was created the password was hashed using password().

If I set $user_password to the actual hash stored in the data and compare literals, it works.
... AND userKey = '$user_password' // where $user_password = *29A59C23ED11F7E2510 for example

This is destroying me. Obviously I don't want to compare literals.

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Are the fields char or varchar? try putting a sql trim around the fields. –  Matt Jan 4 '12 at 23:52

4 Answers 4

You can't expect password() to work when it's being interpreted as text.

Try:

$result = mysql_query("SELECT * FROM $tbl_Name WHERE userID = '$userID' AND userKey = '" . password('$user_password') . "'");
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shouldn't password('$password') return an encrypted string that can be compared with userKey? password() is just a basic encryption function used within the mysql query. It sure worked fine when I inserted the user initially. –  xistva Jan 4 '12 at 14:08
    
i did try the above but got an undefined function call to password() –  xistva Jan 4 '12 at 14:19
    
password is not a valid function in PHP, it is a MYSQL function and thus in this case doesn't work... What the user wanted to tell you to use is crypt and is used totally differently in this context.. –  Mathieu Dumoulin Jan 4 '12 at 20:48

I'm not 100% sure if this will answer the question but here goes.

When a user signs up you hash the password, so on the database the password is a crazy looking string. This can't be reversed so if you want to check if a password entered is right you'll have to hash the new input from the user login in and then compare that hash with the one on your database.

Does that help?

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According to all data I can find that is exactly what I'm attempting to do above by comparing: userKey to password('$password'). when originally the password was INSERTED into the table it was inserted as password('$password'). and when I do the SELECT to compare I'm comparing the already hashed userKey to the password('$password'). But it keeps returning no matches regardless. –  xistva Jan 4 '12 at 13:59
    
Ahh well i'm sorry i must have misunderstood your question. –  ragebunny Jan 4 '12 at 14:02

Instead of using the mysql PASSWORD function which is in my opinion very weak, try to save your passwords into the database encrypted by php. For example:

$password = md5('MyApplicationSalt'.$user['creationdate'].$newpassword);
mysql_query('UPDATE users SET password = "'.$password.'" WHERE id = '.$user['id']);

The main reason to do this is:

Creating a much stronger hash of your password: Using PASSWORD from mysql means that there is no additionnal salting done. If someone were to create a table of all possible passwords from 1-10 characters and then PASSWORD() them and compare to your stolen data, they could reverse the passwords. Using a salt will prevent this in the event that only your data is stolen. Obviously, if code is stolen, it doesn't protect it, the person can search for the hash salt and still reverse it.

Another reason would be to be able to log correctly what you are doing. For example, try logging your SQL query using the method before and check if the data is always the same. It should... if it's not it might be that you have special characters laying somewhere in your string when comparing or when updating...

Good luck

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I think you may have just inspired me to realize the problem. I am betting that the password() INSERTED when I created the user should be stored in a varchar larger than varchar(20).... =) it's comparing (20) chars of a hash to the much longer hash when I do the user verification... userKey VARCHAR(20) BINARY NOT NULL, Also found a pretty good website going into the salting and further explanation of the whole schpeel: phpsec.org/articles/2005/password-hashing.html –  xistva Jan 4 '12 at 20:44
    
Makes a lot of sense, i hope it works and i hope you read the portion about security. Never let security down thinking that it's not a problem. There are new ways to hack websites, servers and databases every day, the better your coding practices, the better your user's data is safe... –  Mathieu Dumoulin Jan 4 '12 at 20:47
    
Mathieu has inspired me to realize my error. userKey VARCHAR(20) BINARY NOT NULL As of MySQL 4.1, the PASSWORD() function has been modified to produce a longer 41-byte hash value. So the problem was... the value stored in the dbase when I created the user was limited to 20 characters while the inputted value for login comparison was a longer 41-byte hash value. Prior to MySQL 4.1, password hashes computed by the PASSWORD() function are 16 bytes long. I was expecting the varchar(20) to hold all of the hash since the book I'm using as a guide was written in 2000....time to buy a new book –  xistva Jan 4 '12 at 20:54
    
wish I could answer my question –  xistva Jan 4 '12 at 21:12
    
you can, just click on the "Answer your own question" button at the bottom of the page but you can't mark it as valid answer before the next 2 days –  Mathieu Dumoulin Jan 4 '12 at 21:30
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks to everyone who answered, particularly Mathieu who inspired me to realize my error.

userKey VARCHAR(20) BINARY NOT NULL

As of MySQL 4.1, the PASSWORD() function has been modified to produce a longer 41-byte hash value.

So the problem was... the value stored in the dbase when I created the user was limited to 20 characters while the inputted value for login comparison was a longer 41-byte hash value.

Prior to MySQL 4.1, password hashes computed by the PASSWORD() function are 16 bytes long.

I was expecting the varchar(20) to hold all of the hash since the book I'm using as a guide was written in 2000....time to buy a new book.

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