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On ASP.NET MVC, I try to write an async Controller action with the old asynchronous programming model (actually, it is the current one, new one is still a CTP).

Here, I am trying to run 4 operations in parallel and it worked great. Here is the complete code:

public class SampleController : AsyncController {

    public void IndexAsync() {

        AsyncManager.OutstandingOperations.Increment(4);

        var task1 = Task<string>.Factory.StartNew(() => {

            return GetReponse1();
        });
        var task2 = Task<string>.Factory.StartNew(() => {

            return GetResponse2();
        });
        var task3 = Task<string>.Factory.StartNew(() => {

            return GetResponse3();
        });
        var task4 = Task<string>.Factory.StartNew(() => {

            return GetResponse4();
        });

        task1.ContinueWith(t => {

            AsyncManager.Parameters["headers1"] = t.Result;
            AsyncManager.OutstandingOperations.Decrement();
        });

        task2.ContinueWith(t => {

            AsyncManager.Parameters["headers2"] = t.Result;
            AsyncManager.OutstandingOperations.Decrement();
        });

        task3.ContinueWith(t => {

            AsyncManager.Parameters["headers3"] = t.Result;
            AsyncManager.OutstandingOperations.Decrement();
        });

        task4.ContinueWith(t => {

            AsyncManager.Parameters["headers4"] = t.Result;
            AsyncManager.OutstandingOperations.Decrement();
        });

        task3.ContinueWith(t => {

            AsyncManager.OutstandingOperations.Decrement();

        }, TaskContinuationOptions.OnlyOnFaulted);
    }

    public ActionResult IndexCompleted(string headers1, string headers2, string headers3, string headers4) {

        ViewBag.Headers = string.Join("<br/><br/>", headers1, headers2, headers3, headers4);

        return View();
    }

    public ActionResult Index2() {

        ViewBag.Headers = string.Join("<br/><br/>", GetReponse1(), GetResponse2(), GetResponse3(), GetResponse4());

        return View();
    }
}

And these below ones are the methods that the async operations are running:

string GetReponse1() {

    var req = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create("http://www.twitter.com");
    req.Method = "HEAD";

    var resp = (HttpWebResponse)req.GetResponse();

    return FormatHeaders(resp.Headers);
}

string GetResponse2() {

    var req2 = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create("http://stackoverflow.com");
    req2.Method = "HEAD";

    var resp2 = (HttpWebResponse)req2.GetResponse();

    return FormatHeaders(resp2.Headers);
}

string GetResponse3() {

    var req = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create("http://google.com");
    req.Method = "HEAD";

    var resp = (HttpWebResponse)req.GetResponse();

    return FormatHeaders(resp.Headers);
}

string GetResponse4() {

    var req = (HttpWebRequest)WebRequest.Create("http://github.com");
    req.Method = "HEAD";

    var resp = (HttpWebResponse)req.GetResponse();

    return FormatHeaders(resp.Headers);
}

private static string FormatHeaders(WebHeaderCollection headers) {

    var headerStrings = from header in headers.Keys.Cast<string>()
                        select string.Format("{0}: {1}", header, headers[header]);

    return string.Join("<br />", headerStrings.ToArray());
}

I have also Index2 method here which is synchronous and does the same thing.

I compare two operation execution times and there is major difference (approx. 2 seconds)

But I think I am missing lots of things here (exception handling, timeouts, etc). I only implement the exception handling on task3 but I don't think it is the right way of doing that.

What is the healthiest way of handling exceptions for this kind of operations?

share|improve this question
    
Duplicated question? stackoverflow.com/questions/6171273/… –  Nat Jan 4 '12 at 14:18

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Before accessing the result of a task you should test whether it completed successfully. If there was an error you should not try to access the results but instead do something with the exception:

task1.ContinueWith(t => 
{
    if (!t.IsFaulted)
    {
        AsyncManager.Parameters["headers1"] = t.Result;
    }
    else if (t.IsFaulted && t.Exception != null)
    {
        AsyncManager.Parameters["error"] = t.Exception;
    }
    AsyncManager.OutstandingOperations.Decrement();
});
share|improve this answer
    
I see now. I tried to access the result of task when I throw an exception on purpose and that's why the operations just ran endlessly. Do you think that I will be 100% safe with this approach and be able to throw appropriate exceptions? Also, do you think if I should implement AsyncTimeout attribute here? –  tugberk Jan 4 '12 at 14:25

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