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I have the following two files:

file1.c

int main(){
  foo();
  return 0;
}

file2.c

void foo(){

 }

Can I compile and link the two files together so the file1.c will recognize the foo function without adding extern?

Updated the prototype.

gcc file1.c file2.c throws: warning: implicit declaration of function foo.

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1  
gcc file1.c file2.c, also I don't know C's exact rules for function calls when it's not seen a prototype but you might have to add int foo(); above main –  Seth Carnegie Jan 4 '12 at 14:48
    
@Seth: please always -include -Wall when giving gcc examples - it helps to get noobs into good habits. –  Paul R Jan 4 '12 at 14:54
    
I updated the question. I do it with -Wall. –  mary Jan 4 '12 at 14:55
    
Seth, Thanks! It worked!! –  mary Jan 4 '12 at 15:03
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You don't need an extern, but file1.c must see a declaration that foo() exists. Usually this declaration is in a header file.

To add a forward declaration without using a header file, simply modify file1.c to:

int foo();  // add this declaration

int main(){
  foo();
  return 0;
}
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can I do it without any header files just by compiling the two together? –  mary Jan 4 '12 at 14:56
    
You still need a forward declaration of foo(), which you could do in file1.c if you want. –  chrisaycock Jan 4 '12 at 14:58
    
@mary yes, header files are for the compiler but this is done by the linker –  Seth Carnegie Jan 4 '12 at 14:59
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You can, but you shouldn't.

Use a header file, file2.h:

// file2.h

void foo(); // prototype for function foo()

Then add:

#include "file2.h" 

in file1.c

To compile:

$ gcc -Wall file1.c file2.c -o foo

As a general rule it's better (more robust) to use a header file to define the interface of each module rather than ad hoc prototypes within dependent modules. This is sometimes known as the SPOT (Single Point Of Truth) principle.

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3  
@Anonymous down-voter: please clarify your objection ? –  Paul R Jan 4 '12 at 14:51
    
You don't need extern for calling a function, you only need the prototype, like int foo(); in the header and the body in file2.c –  Seth Carnegie Jan 4 '12 at 15:00
    
@Seth: true - you don't need it, but there is nothing wrong with making it explicit. –  Paul R Jan 4 '12 at 15:02
    
I've never seen anyone make a function extern just because it's in another file. Saying you can but shouldn't write a function in another file without using extern on the prototype is completely baseless, unless you know something I don't (which is likely) –  Seth Carnegie Jan 4 '12 at 15:04
    
@Seth: not at all - the prototype is extern whether you explicitly declare it extern or use C's implicit rules. I put it there to make it clear for noobs that it's a prototype, but mostly people don't use the explicit extern declaration form these days. –  Paul R Jan 4 '12 at 15:05
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The correct way is as follows:

file1.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include "file2.h"

int main(void){
    printf("%s:%s:%d \n", __FILE__, __FUNCTION__, __LINE__);
    foo();
    return 0;
}

file2.h

void foo(void);

file2.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include "file2.h"

void foo(void) {
    printf("%s:%s:%d \n", __FILE__, __func__, __LINE__);
    return;
}

output

$
$ gcc file1.c file2.c -o file -Wall
$
$ ./file 
file1.c:main:6 
file2.c:foo:6 
$ 
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The C99 pre-defined identifier is __func__. Prefer this to the gcc specific __FUNCTION__. –  pmg Jan 4 '12 at 15:18
1  
I don't think it's good practice to pass the header to the compiler like that - if it's needed, the preprocessor will bring it in. –  Timothy Jones Jan 4 '12 at 15:18
    
@pmg Good catch. Thanks! –  Sangeeth Saravanaraj Jan 4 '12 at 15:21
    
@TimothyJones My apologies. That is a nice point. Thanks for keeping a check on the answer! .. I have corrected it now! –  Sangeeth Saravanaraj Jan 4 '12 at 15:22
    
Also please always include -Wall in any gcc command line example. –  Paul R Jan 4 '12 at 15:23
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It's ugly, but using gcc, you could:

gcc -include file2.c file1.c

-include is a flag to the preprocessor which will include the contents of file2.c at the very top of file1.c. Having said that, it's a poor choice, and breaks down for all but the simplest of programs.

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Don't try this at home! But +1 anyway. –  ugoren Jan 4 '12 at 19:52
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