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I'm working on a step indicator which I implemented as a list:

<ol>
    <li>Step 1</li>
    <li class="active">Step 2</li>
    <li>Step 3</li>
</ol>

Each list element has a rounded edge to it's right in order to indicate progress, so I have the following CSS:

li{
  display: block; background-color: white; width: 33%; border: 1px solid #ddd; text-indent: 40px;
  float: left;
  margin: 0 0 0 -20px;
  border-radius: 0 15px 15px 0;
}

My problem is that later elements are shadowing the earlier, thus the rounded edge are hidden. I've tried to set a decreasing z-index for each element, but it doesn't work (besides I couldn't use this solution anyway). I acheive the desired presentation by changing to float:right but that renders the list items in descending order...

Check this jsfiddle for details: http://jsfiddle.net/fMRbr/

share|improve this question
    
why don't you use float: right and just change the order of steps in your markup? jsfiddle.net/fMRbr/1 –  Zoltan Toth Jan 4 '12 at 15:11
1  
@ZoltanToth: That would make no sense if anything that doesn't understand CSS ever sees it. Don't do things like that; content should be useful even without styling. –  You Jan 4 '12 at 15:16
    
I could do that, but I think it would be a little awkward. I was hoping for a better way to achieve this, being better semantically. –  Jørgen Jan 4 '12 at 15:17
    
Do you want the list items to overlap? It's unclear whether that's your intended result. The CSS you provided can easily be updated to provide a non-overlapping solution, but that might not be what you want. –  TLS Jan 4 '12 at 15:29
    
I want them to overlap, but I want to turn the direction of how the elements are stacked. –  Jørgen Jan 4 '12 at 15:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can use the :before - http://jsfiddle.net/fMRbr/14/

<ol>
    <li class="active">Step 1</li>
    <li class="afteractive">Step 2</li>
    <li>Step 3</li>
</ol>

and the CSS

li{
    display: inline-block;
    width: 33%;
    margin: 0 0 0 -20px;
    border: 1px solid #ddd;
    border-radius: 0 15px 15px 0;
    background-color: white;
    text-indent: 40px;

    position: relative;
}

li.active{
 background-color: red;   
}

li:before{
    content: '';
    width: 15px;
    height: 20px;
    display: inline-block;
    background: #fff;
    border: 0;
    border-radius: 0 15px 15px 0;
    position: absolute;
    top: 0;
    left: -3px;
}

li.afteractive:before {
    background: #f00;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I like the idea! Although it doesn't seem to work between two white elements..? –  Jørgen Jan 6 '12 at 14:59
    
I've added the border, so it works - jsfiddle.net/fMRbr/15 –  Zoltan Toth Jan 6 '12 at 15:46

Instead of using border-radius and negative margin values, have you considered a Tbackground image at the top right of each <li> which looks like this:

Greather than symbol

The active (red) <li> would have a similar background but colored red. The result should look something like this:

enter image description here

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The finaly solution will probably be based on a right aligned background image, but I also need to solve the line at the top and at the bottom, which shouldn't go all the way to the edge. –  Jørgen Jan 4 '12 at 15:24

Add a span tag to your li's with display: inline-block so they automatically grow to the right width:

html

<ol>
  <li><span>Step 1</span></li>
  <li class="active"><span>Step 2</span></li>
  <li><span>Step 3</span></li>
</ol>

css

li {
  display: block;
  float: left;
  width: 33%;
  margin: 0 0 0 -20px;
  background-color: white;
  text-indent: 40px;
}
li.active {
}

li.active span {
  background-color: red;
}
li span {
  display: inline-block;
  border: 1px solid #ddd;
  border-radius: 0 15px 15px 0;
  padding-right: 10px;
}

See a jsfiddle of this solution here:

http://jsfiddle.net/c4urself/HYQSJ/

share|improve this answer
    
But I do need the items to overlap, only in the other direction, so that the result would be like @NobRuked's image. –  Jørgen Jan 4 '12 at 15:35

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