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I'm trying to see if a specific string exists in an html page but I can't seem to find an easy way to get the string that represents the body.

I've attempted:

http.request(Method.GET, { req ->
        uri.path = '/x/app/main'
        response.success = { resp, reader ->
            assert resp.status == 200
            println reader.text.startsWith('denied')
        }

        response.failure = { resp ->
            fail("Failure reported: ${resp.statusLine}")
        }
    })

but reader.text is a NodeChildren object.

How do I get the html (or more specifically, the contexts of the body) as a string?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can get an input stream directly off of the response. Try this:

http.request(Method.GET, { req ->
    uri.path = '/x/app/main'
    response.success = { resp ->
        assert resp.status == 200
        println resp.entity.content.text.startsWith('denied')
    }

    response.failure = { resp ->
        fail("Failure reported: ${resp.statusLine}")
    }
})
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Tried it and got the error: java.lang.IllegalStateException: Content has been consumed at org.apache.http.entity.BasicHttpEntity.getContent(BasicHttpEntity.java:84) at org.apache.http.conn.BasicManagedEntity.getContent(BasicManagedEntity.java:87) –  user965697 Jan 4 '12 at 16:28
    
Make sure you're using a one-arg response.success closure. If you use a two-arg version (response.success = { resp, reader ->), you'll get that exception. –  ataylor Jan 4 '12 at 16:36
    
That appears to have done it! Thanks. Question: Is there any good docs that list what is in the response? I can't even find how you came up with that :) –  user965697 Jan 4 '12 at 16:42
    
Once you know what classes you're dealing with, the javadocs are not too bad. In particular, HttpResponseDecorator is a good starting point. –  ataylor Jan 4 '12 at 22:57
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