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How would a DJBX33X hash function be implemented in C#? The following is code for this function in C.

uint32_t hash(const char *arKey, uint32_t nKeyLength) 
{
    uint32_t hash = 5381;

    for (; nKeyLength > 0; nKeyLength -=1) 
    {
        hash = ((hash << 5) + hash) ^ *arKey++;
    }

    return hash;
}

UPDATED here is my code so far, but results from C and C# functions are different, did I missed something?

public static long hash(string str)
{           
    long hash = 5381;

    for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i++)
    {
        hash = ((hash << 5) + hash) ^ (int)str[i];
    }

    return hash;
}

UPDATED 2 the following are outpus of C and C#

C#

t = 116(<<172192+177573) -> 177617
t = 116(<<5683744+5861361) -> 5861253
u = 117(<<187560096+193421349) -> 193421392
U = 85(<<6189484544+6382905936) -> 6382905861
'ttuU' => '6382905861'

C

t = 116 (<<172192+177573) -> 177617
t = 116 (<<5683744+5861361) -> 5861253
u = 117 (<<187560096+193421349) -> 193421392
U = 85 (<<1894517248+2087938640) -> 2087938565
'ttuU' -> '2087938565'
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1  
What have you tried so far? I don't see anything particularly difficult for C# to accomplish given that C code... –  aardvarkk Jan 4 '12 at 15:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's likely the data type is important for the hash implementation; you'd have to refer to documentation for an exact answer, but this function produces the results you're expecting:

public static uint Hash(string str)
{
    uint result = 5381;

    for (int i = 0; i < str.Length; i++)
    {
        result = ((result << 5) + result) ^ str[i];
    }

    return result;
}

Example output:

Hash("ttuU") -> 2087938565
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yes I think you’re right the overflow is part of this function design. –  Darius Kucinskas Jan 6 '12 at 6:59

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